Women and gender

WinS4Girls Distance Learning Course book

The WinS4Girls E-Course was developed and delivered as part of the 14 country UNICEF project funded by the Government of Canada. The WinS4Girls E-Course was designed by the Center for Global Safe WASH at Emory University and UNICEF to help strengthen the capacity of WASH practitioners and policymakers to carry out rigorous research that investigates local MHM practices and challenges. It includes step-by-step modules for planning formative research into MHM.

Date: 22 May 2017

WASH challenges to girls’ menstrual hygiene management in Metro Manila, Masbate, and South Central Mindanao, Philippines

This paper examines water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions that enable and hinder Philippine schoolgirls to hygienically manage their menstruation. We collected qualitative data from 13 schools in three regions of the Philippines. Schools in both urban (Metro Manila) and rural areas (Masbate and South Central Mindanao) were included to allow for comparison across settings.

Date: 22 May 2017
Country: 

Menstrual hygiene: a ‘silent’ need during disaster recovery

Post-disaster relief and recovery operations seldom focus on women’s priorities regarding menstrual hygiene. There is an increasing awareness to incorporate inclusive, participatory, and gender-sensitive strategies for implementation of response programmes. This article presents empirical findings related to menstrual hygiene management (MHM), demonstrating it is integral to women’s privacy and safety during recovery. Using case studies from India, the 2012 Assam floods and 2013 Cyclone Phailin in Odisha, this article explores menstrual hygiene practices in a post-disaster context.

Date: 22 May 2017

What is the scope for addressing menstrual hygiene management in complex humanitarian emergencies? A global review

Global attention on improving the integration of menstrual hygiene management (MHM) into humanitarian response is growing. However, there continues to be a lack of consensus on how best to approach MHM inclusion within response activities. This global review assessed the landscape of MHM practice, policy, and research within the field of humanitarian response.

Date: 22 May 2017

Supporting the rights of girls and women through MHM: Realities, progress and opportunities

This synthesis of the MHM context across the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region has been initiated jointly by the Education and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) teams of the UNICEF East Asia and Pacific Regional Office (EAPRO). It aims to provide an overview of the experiences of girls and women and the current status of MHM programming and action across the region. The main focus has been on the school context linked to WASH in Schools (WinS); but MHM related to out-of-school youth, at community level, in humanitarian contexts and in the workplace have also been included.

Date: 22 May 2017

Supporting the Rights of Girls and Women through MHM in the East Asia and Pacific Region

Women and girls continue to be subjected to multiple challenges when it comes to menstrual hygiene management (MHM), due to things like taboos; norms and practices; a lack of access to accurate information; poor access to sanitary products and poor access to Water Sanitation and Hygiene facilities. The real life consequences of this, can affect a girl’s education, as well as some of her other rights, including her right to equality, health and dignity.

Date: 22 May 2017

What can existing data on water and sanitation tell us about menstrual hygiene management?

Half of the global population menstruate as part of their life cycle. This involves water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) needs that are often overlooked. Experience from the Millennium Development Goals shows that states focus on targets that are measured globally. Data and indicators on menstrual hygiene management (MHM) for women and girls can have a positive impact on raising awareness, national policy making, and in finding sustainable WASH sector solutions.

Date: 22 May 2017

Menstrual Hygiene Management – The experience of nomadic and sedentary populations in Niger

This study examines and analyses behaviours and practices for the management of menstrual hygiene and their impact on the living conditions of sedentary and nomadic women and girls in Niger. The study was carried out in the regions of Maradi, Zinder, Tahoua and Tillabéri under the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation in West and Central Africa and implemented by WSSCC and UN Women. The findings of the study reveal various shortcomings, especially in rural areas and, more specifically, among nomadic populations.

Date: 4 April 2017
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