Policy and advocacy for sanitation

Access to toilets in Ghana still low

Mr Julius Debrah, Minister for Local Government and Rural Development Wednesday expressed exasperation about the rather slow improvement in the access to toilets by citizens across the country. He said the six percent access in 1990 rose to only 15 percent in 2013, a dismal situation, giving indication, Ghana might not meet the Millennium Development Goal (MGD) target of 54 percent. Mr Debrah gave this assessment in a speech read for him at a ceremony in Ho to mark World Toilet Day in Ghana.

Negros Oriental (Philippines) vows to end open defecation

Some 24 percent of Negros Oriental household population are still practicing open defecation or having unsanitary toilets.This was reported during the first Provincial Sanitation Summit (29th October 2014) by Assistant Provincial Health Officer Dr. Edgardo Barredo as Negros Oriental marches towards zero open defecation (ZOD) under the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP). According to Dr.

Need to clean our biases first, then our streets

The country is ostensibly in the throes of a great social movement for sanitation. Gandhi’s name is evoked, Prime Minister Narendra Modi leads from the front, ministers lift brooms for cameras, and officers, college and school children take oaths against littering and to clean their surroundings. Earlier the PM pledges in his Independence Day speech toilets for girls and boys in all schools.

We have a lot to learn...

Last week’s Water and Health Conference held at the University of North Carolina’s Water Institute had an array of different workshops, side events and oral and poster presentations focusing on sanitation. After only a day into the week-long event two important messages started to emerge. Firstly, the sanitation problem is endemic in certain parts of the world, especially India, and unfortunately we do not know a lot and have an awful lot to learn.

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