Policy and advocacy for sanitation

Women sports stars to promote sanitation in Jharkhand, India

In a noble move, the state government on Saturday announced the decision to use women sportspersons to promote sanitation and hygiene in Jharkhand. Deputy chief minister Hemant Soren, who is in-charge of the drinking water and sanitation department, said the department had already taken a decision and the officials would soon prepare a list of women sportspersons, including those who were not active today but have brought laurels to country and the state in national and international events in the past.

First community sanitation stocktaking workshop in Tamale

The first ever  three-day community led total sanitation (CLTS) stocktaking forum has been held in the Northern regional capital, Tamale, against the backdrop of Ghana’s deplorably low national sanitation coverage, which currently stands at 14%. The theme for the forum was “Achieving Open Defecation Free Ghana Through Effective Learning and Sharing”.

Read the rest of the article in the Ghana Business News 27th November 2012

Why Nigeria can't meet MDG targets, by WaterAid

Country Representative of the WaterAid Nigeria Programme, Dr. Michael Ojo, has described sanitation, water and hygiene as fundamental to dealing with issues of poverty and underdevelopment in Nigeria. Ojo, who disclosed this in a chat with The Guardian at the weekend, said the burden of lack of access to improved sanitation and safe drinking water is borne mostly by the poorest people.

Government celebrates World Toilet Day

In Ghana, the latest statistics published by the World Health Organization (WHO)/United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in 2012 shows that only 15 per cent (3.7 million) Ghanaians have access to clean, safe improved toilets in their homes, 58 per cent of the population share toilets with their neighbours or use public toilets and another 4.6 million Ghanaians defecate in the open daily.

Pakistan must not overlook defecation problem

Uttering the word ‘defecation’ is often considered impolite. People say ‘going to the back’ and ‘folding legs’. Many people also ask where to wash their hands rather than where the toilet is, avoiding the ‘dirty’ word for the sake of politeness. While talking openly about defecation may cause discomfort or embarrassment, it is a topic we all need to discuss.

Pakistan must not overlook defecation problem

Uttering the word ‘defecation’ is often considered impolite. People say ‘going to the back’ and ‘folding legs’. Many people also ask where to wash their hands rather than where the toilet is, avoiding the ‘dirty’ word for the sake of politeness. While talking openly about defecation may cause discomfort or embarrassment, it is a topic we all need to discuss.

World Toilet Day 2012: Stories of hope and signs of progress

World Toilet Day logo
The 19th November is World Toilet Day, a day to raise awareness of the global sanitation challenge- one in three people on the planet do not have access to a hygienic toilet - and of how much there still is to do to ensure that approximately 2.5 billion of people around the globe gain access to improved sanitation. It's a day to break the silence and taboos around toilets and all things shit. But also a day to celebrate the good work that is being done and what has been achieved already. So we asked people around the world to tell us what experience, activity or event in the last year signals to them that progress is being made in the area of sanitation?
Date: 15 November 2012

Indonesia is 3rd lowest ranked ASEAN country in terms of sanitation quality

Indonesia is the third-lowest ranking ASEAN country in terms of sanitation quality, according to Public Works Minister Djoko Kirmanto.“We’re obviously not in the worst position, but that’s where we are. Just look at UNICEF’s data from 2011, which reported that 26 percent of Indonesian citizens are still defecating in open spaces,” Djoko said on Monday at a sanitation conference in Jakarta, as quoted by Antara news agency.

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