Monitoring and sustainability

Developing Markets for Sanitation: A Blog Series

In response to the growing prevalence of market-based approaches to sanitation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened a meeting between three leading sanitation development practitioners—iDE, PSI, and Water for People—to discuss their experiences in building supply capacity and demand for sanitation products and services, and possibly develop a joint understanding of the process.

Date: 22 June 2017

Health and Hygiene across the Life Course: World Health Assembly 2017 side session report

During the World Health Assembly 2017, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), SCA, Government of Kenya and WaterAid came together to share approaches to ensure good hygiene and health practices and to raise standards across the life course, from childhood to adolescence, from motherhood to menopause, to old age and responding to disabilities. The session took place in the morning on 24 May 2017 at the Intercontinental Hotel in Geneva, and was attended by more than 40 international delegates from UN agencies, private sector, member states, NGOs and academia.

Date: 22 June 2017

How can a program design rural sanitation financial support to reach the most disadvantaged? (Webinar)

Hosted by the Cambodian Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Sub-Group (RuSH), this interactive webinar will discuss how different programs have tried to design rural sanitation subsidies to reach the poorest. Examples will be shared from India, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Cambodia. Rapid presentations will be followed by discussion questions and polls for participants to share their rural sanitation knowledge with others.

Poop & Earn: How Villages around Raipur Are Making Money by Going Open Defecation Free

“Hum tumko maar denge – We will kill you,” were the words that Mehataru Sahu, the Sarpanch of Ilda village, heard when he tried to convince the villagers that they should build toilets in their houses.

Mehataru’s response was resolute, “Kill me if you want, but do that after you build a toilet in your house.”

'Nothing about us without us!': the Philippines' approach to Zero Open Defecation

Following the workshop facilitated jointly by the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS and UNICEF which looked at how best to support the poorest and most vulnerable in sanitation at scale, the Ministry of Health and UNICEF facilitated a one-day workshop for Government and partners in the Philippines on the 29th May 2017. The purpose of this workshop was to share the learning from the first few days discussions and to consider the opportunities and challenges to applying different subsidy and reward schemes in the context of the Philippines in supporting the poorest.

Untangling complexity: How do we ensure we effectively reach, support and involve the most disadvantaged?

Have had the great opportunity to take part in a workshop organised jointly by the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS and UNICEF, which looked at how best to support the poorest and most vulnerable in sanitation at scale.

The participants included a mix of some of the leading lights and people active in: CLTS and participatory techniques; smart subsidies; and equity and inclusion. It also included representatives of organisations implementing sanitation at scale:

Kenya creates online system to monitor rural sanitation

Kenya has launched an online monitoring, evaluation and reporting system to improve capturing of data on sanitation and hygiene status. The online portal could help coordinate monitoring of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), and enable public health officials in rural areas facilitate rapid acceleration of the Open Defecation Free (ODF) campaign, experts say.

Discovering sanitation realities through rural immersions

At the end of last year the CLTS Knowledge Hub heard that the Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Indore, in collaboration with UNICEF and the Government of Madhya Pradesh, were sending 630 of their first year management students to spend a week living in 157 open defecation free (ODF) villages. The villages cut across 13 districts in the central Indian State of Madhya Pradesh. Students were asked to verify ODF status of villages through a household survey and early morning and evening inspections of open defecation sites.

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