Monitoring and sustainability

Key resource: Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? Analysis from the AfricaSan Conference, Kigali, Rwanda

Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? (IWA Publishing 2013, eds Piers Cross and Yolande Coombes) takes stock of progress made by African countries through the AfricaSan process since 2008 and the progress needed to meet the MDG on sanitation by 2015 and beyond. This book addresses priorities which have been identified by African countries as the key elements which need to be addressed in order to accelerate progress.

Date: 21 October 2013

Jirani sanitation groups: sustaining open defecation free status in Tanzania

The sustainability of open defecation free (ODF) status in rural areas where toilets frequently collapse is a global concern.  In Tanzania, SNV has developed an innovative approach called Jirani sanitation groups (JSGs). 'Jirani' means neighbour and the approach is based on community support; if a toilet collapses another can be built with the help of neighbours.

Date: 31 January 2019
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How To Manual – the K-Ship Real Time Learning Approach

Development programmes tend to document the progress of their activities at the end of reporting cycles (monthly, quarterly, annually etc.). This approach has however not always been effective in significantly contributing to effective programming.  As a result, K-SHIP made a collective decision to start reporting in ‘real time’ so addressing, documenting and sharing problems and learnings as they arise rather than a significant time after.

Date: 10 January 2019

The Nakuru Accord: failing better in the WASH sector

Things can, and do, go wrong in water, sanitation and hygiene. In July 2018, an event at the Water Engineering Development Centre (WEDC) Conference in Nakuru, Kenya, 'Blunders, Bloopers and Foul-ups: A WASH Game Show' inspired a call for WASH professionals to publicly commit to sharing their failures and learning from one another.

Determining the effectiveness and mode of operation of Community-Led total Sanitation: The DEMO-CLTS study

This is the final report of a project in which CLTS was analysed using the RANAS (Risks, Attitudes, Norms, Abilities, and Self‐regulation) approach. In this project, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, two cross sectional studies in Cambodia and Mozambique and one big field experiment with 3120 households in northern Ghana were conducted. The following research questions were addressed in this study:

Date: 20 December 2018
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Sustainability and WASH: reflections from the UNC Water and Health Conference 2018

The University of North Carolina (UNC), Water and Health Conference 2018 in Chapel Hill, United States, provided researchers, implementers and donors the opportunity to reflect and discuss how the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector is achieving sustainability, the biggest challenges to progress and possible ways forward to make sanitation outcomes equitable, accessible and affordable to everyone at all times. (The UNC Water and Health Conference is held at Chapel Hill since 2011)

Achieving sustainability in WASH research and programming

Report from State-level Rapid Action Learning Workshop in Bihar, India

A state level workshop to share, learn and plan with quality and sustainability in the context of Swachh Bharat Mission was organised by the Government of Bihar, in association with WSSCC and IDS, on October 29th - 31st, 2018. It brought together 75 participants from 10 districts of Bihar, viz., Katihar, Banka, West Champaran, Begusarai, Aurangabad, Nalanda, Bhagalpur, Bhagalpur, Siwan, Patna and Madhubani. Seven of these districts are allotted to WSSCC by Government of India to support as development partner and remaining are the districts where Global Sanitation Fund was implemented.

Date: 14 November 2018
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ODF+, ODF++ and Sustainability of Sanitation: Thematic Discussion Series Synthesis

The clock is counting down to 2nd October 2019, the Government of India’s date to eradicate open defecation. It is quickly becoming clear the Government is looking at how to consolidate gains made in the past few years on sanitation and not being undone by slippages. As the mission has progressed, the sanitation coverage of rural India has increased to 94.73% and 19 states and UTS, 432 districts and 422,650 villages have been declared as open defecation-free (ODF). Still, there is need to construct as many 148 million toilets in one year (SBM MIS, 2018).

Date: 9 November 2018
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