Monitoring and sustainability

Tiger worm toilets turn poo into fertiliser in crowded cities and refugee camps

Tiger worm toilets which turn human waste into fertiliser could prove to be an affordable and sustainable sanitation solution for increasingly crowded slums and refugee camps across the developing world, water and sanitation experts say.

The earthworm-filled toilets take up less space than pit latrines, need to be emptied far less frequently, present less of a health risk, and can provide communities with rich compost for growing crops, according to sanitation specialists.

Making shit a commodity: finding a fortune at the bottom of a leach pit

Leach pit emptying events should not remain stand-alone activity. Forward and backward linkages in making manure a commodity bought, sold and traded in market will be very much helpful in shifting preference to leach pits and issue of partial usage can be tackled and will be surely a win-win situation for all stakeholders.

India's Rural Sanitation: From lose-lose to win-win

Prime Minister Modi has set the 2nd October 2019 as the target date for rural India to be Open Defecation Free (ODF). Remarkable progress has been achieved, but there is a very long way still to go.  One major problem is partial usage of toilets.  Jamie Myers and I reviewed studies and surveys and their methodologies and concluded that in rural North India at least half the toilets that are functioning are not used by all members of the household all the time.

Papua New Guinea Rural WaSH Sustainability Study

The World Bank Group’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) provides technical assistance to support the development of government institutions and capacity building, sector policies and strategies in the water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) sector in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Following a Water and Sanitation Service Deliver Assessment that identified serious bottlenecks and a lack of clarity around the roles and responsibilities in the PNG WaSH sector, WSP supported the rural WaSH Policy Task Force to develop a National Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Policy which was approved in January 2015.

Date: 30 January 2017
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Process Evaluation of Tanzania’s National Sanitation Campaign

In 2013, the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) commissioned the Sanitation, Hygiene Applied Research for Equity (SHARE) consortium to design and implement a process evaluation of Phase I (2011-2015) of the Government of Tanzania’s (GoT) National Sanitation Campaign (NSC).

Date: 30 January 2017
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Mobile Platform Enables Unprecedented Sanitation Uptake in Zambia

CLTS has been shown to be an effective method to combat malnutrition and stunting in children under five. In this study, a mobile-to-web platform increased the uptake of CLTS even further, allowing for greater community feedback, a reduced cost per new user of sanitation, and increased data transparency.

Akros, in partnership with Zambia’s Ministry of Local Government and Housing (MLGH) and UNICEF, layered a unique mobile-to-web application over traditional CLTS delivery methods, resulting in an innovative service delivery and monitoring system dubbed “CLTS M2W.”

Thinking Beyond the Finish Line: Sustainable Sanitation Services for All

From the 14th to 17th March 2017. A regional face-to-face learning event ‘Thinking beyond the Finish Line: Sustainable Sanitation Services for All’ was held in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, as part of SNV’s Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All (SSH4A) Programme.  The specific objectives of the event were to

 

Date: 11 January 2017

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