menstrual hygiene

3rd Annual Virtual Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in WASH in Schools (WinS) Conference

Hosted by Columbia University and UNICEF on October 29, 2014, the 3rd Annual Virtual MHM Conference will provide an opportunity to share lessons learned with the WinS community around the world, with a particular focus on MHM programming in WinS in various contexts.

Reporting back from the 37th WEDC Conference in Hanoi- Day 1

It’s my 5th WEDC conference! This year the conference is in Hanoi, Vietnam co-hosted with the National University of Civil Engineering. WEDC Conference is a key international meeting attended by WASH policy and programme staff, academics, activists and experts. The papers will be available on-line shortly (www.wedc-knowledge.lboro.ac.uk) but in anticipation, here are some thoughts from the conference about the research and practice presented.

Most Rural Girls Skip School During Period

About 95 percent of girls in Ghana, particularly those in rural communities, miss school during their menstrual periods due to the lack of hygienic materials, inconsistent supply of water and soap, inadequate disposal and collection of sanitary products, John Baidoo, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Sustainable Development Focus Limited (SUDEF), a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) has indicated.

WASH in Schools Empowers Girls’ Education: Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2013

There is increasing interest in exploring and addressing the menstrual hygiene management (MHM) barriers facing schoolgirls and female teachers in educational settings. Around the globe, WASH in Schools (WinS) focuses on fostering social inclusion and individual self-respect – and addresses MHM as a key agenda. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, integrating MHM into WinS empowers all students, and especially encourages girls and female teachers.

Date: 16 May 2014

CLTS in Kenya and menstrual hygiene management

Gathering by the CLTS stall at the WEDC Conference in Nakuru

Our third day at the WEDC conference in Nakuru started with an open meeting at the CLTS stall. As those who participated were primarily from Kenya, most of the discussion dealt with sanitation in the country.

The first topic discussed was the need of political commitment at higher levels if CLTS is to be rolled out at the country level. When it is in place, solutions are quickly found to the ‘common’ obstacles CLTS faces when scaling up (lack of capacity, human resources etc.).

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