Health

Key resource: CLTS Knowledge Hub Learning Brief: West and Central Africa Regional Rural Sanitation Workshop

The CLTS Knowledge Hub, based at the Institute of Development Studies, WaterAid, WSSCC and UNICEF co-convened a regional workshop in Saly, Senegal, 25th-28th June 2018 with support from AGETIP. The event brought together those engaged in rural WASH programming from 14 countries across the region (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic Congo (DRC), Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, and Togo) alongside experts working at regional and global levels.

Date: 17 September 2018

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

WASH in Healthcare Facilities

Practical Steps for WASH in Healthcare Facilities (UNICEF)

Around the world people are being treated in health care facilities that lack adequate water, sanitation, hygiene materials and the right waste segregation- essentials that make health care safe. In 2018 the United Nations Secretary-General, António Guterres issued a Global Call to Action on WASH in all health care facilities to address this problem.

Date: 16 April 2019

Changes in open defecation in rural north India: 2014 – 2018

This paper reports on two surveys in rural north India. The first survey visited rural Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh in late 2018. It collected data on 9,812 people and interviewed 156 local government officials. The second survey, in Udaipur district, visited 505 households in 19 villages and 60 households in two census towns.
This new research sheds light on what the SBM did and on changes in open defecation since 2014. It is informative about changes because researchers revisited families who participated in a 2014 survey.

Date: 31 January 2019
Country: 

Emotional demonstrations (emo-demos) of handwashing with soap at vaccination centres

Emotional demonstrations (emo-demos) are used in behaviour-centred design to trigger behaviour changes, such as handwashing with soap, by creating disgust and shame. This eight-page case study presents the emo-demo for triggering behaviour changes at vaccination centres, which were found to be ideal places to raise awareness of the importance of washing hands with soap among pregnant women, mothers and caregivers.

Date: 31 January 2019
Country: 

Impact of social capital, harassment of women and girls, and water and sanitation access on premature birth and low infant birth weight in India

Globally, preterm birth (PTB) and low infant birth weight (LBW) are leading causes of maternal and child morbidity and mortality. Inadequate water and sanitation access (WASH) are risk factors for PTB and LBW in low-income countries. Physical stress from carrying water and psychosocial stress from addressing sanitation needs in the open may be mechanisms underlying these associations. If so, then living in a community with strong social capital should be able to buffer the adverse effects of WASH on birth outcomes.

Date: 12 November 2018
Country: 

Blog: Ways forward for rural sanitation in Africa

The CLTS Knowledge Hub  has had a busy year! We have hosted and facilitated two regional rural sanitation workshops in Africa.

Read this blog on the approach, challenges and sucsesses of the two events  - including learning briefs on both events available in Enlgish and French.

(This blog is published on the Institute of Develoment Studies (IDS) website.)

New WHO Guidelines on Sanitation and Health

The World Health Organisation have developed new guidelines on sanitation and health because current sanitation programmes are not achieving anticipated health gains and there is a lack of authoritative health-based guidance on sanitation. The new guidelines summarise the evidence on the effectiveness of a range of sanitation interventions and provide a comprehensive framework for health-protecting sanitation, covering policy and governance measures, implementation of sanitation technologies, systems and behavioural interventions, risk-based management, and monitoring approaches.

Date: 15 October 2018

State of Hygiene in Southern Africa

Without good hygiene practices, such as toilet use, handwashing with soap, water treatment, food hygiene, and menstrual hygiene, the benefits of other poverty reduction strategies will be undermined, and human dignity will be compromised.

The State of Hygiene in Southern Africa study was commissioned to gather evidence regarding: the status of hygiene practice in the region; the enabling environment and institutional arrangements for the promotion of hygiene behavior change; and key policy and programme bottlenecks for the prioritisation of hygiene.

Date: 15 October 2018

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