equity and inclusion

'I hated the stench and filth': India's scavengers escape dirty work

A project in Delhi is retraining people who clean human excrement with their bare hands to find work as housekeepers. The training is the result of Shahdara district magistrate Kumar Mahesh’s determination to end manual scavenging. The project team found it hard to identify manual scavengers in Shahdara as many (most of whom are Dalits) are too ashamed to admit their occupation. But they finally managed to persuade 28 people to enrol for the part-time course where they learn housekeeping skills enabling them to leave the dehumanising work of scavenging behind.

WASH Experiences of Women Living with Disabilities in Cambodia

Cambodia’s access to basic water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) remains low compared to other Southeast Asian countries despite improvements over the last decade. There is limited documentation about the WASH experiences of women with disabilities in Cambodia, for which this publication recommends paying greater attention to the issue.

 

Key messages within this eight-page brief:

Date: 13 September 2018
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Fostering Collective Action to Improve Sanitation in Rural Cambodia

Rural Cambodia is home to the largest proportion of individuals practicing open defecation in Southeast Asia. The Cambodia Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Improvement Program (CRSHIP) has sought to address harmful sanitation practices by increasing access to improved sanitation and promoting proper hygiene in rural target areas.

Date: 13 September 2018
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UNICEF Game plan to end open defecation

The game plan outlines UNICEF’s programmatic focus and approaches in sanitation over the next four years to 2021. It will help ensure that ending open defecation receives the deliberate and sustained attention it will require to succeed: without a constant focus on the issue, there is no doubt that both the SDG objectives and UNICEF’s objectives for sanitation (as per Goal Area 4 in the Strategic Plan 2018-2021) will be jeopardised. The game plan will ensure that there is a strong emphasis on both equity and the sustainability of results, in line with UNICEF’s WASH Strategy 2016-2030.

Date: 13 September 2018

CLTS Rapid Appraisal Protocol (C-RAP). A tool for rapid assessment of the practice of CLTS at scale

CLTS rapid Appraisal Protocol (CRAP) is a diagnostic tool to review the quality and effectiveness of CLTS programming in a country. The success of CLTS in triggering communities for collective behaviour change has been a global phenomenon. However achieving scale in a planned, coordinated and consistent manner to move beyond ODF villages towards generating ODF districts, regions and nations has been challenging. Furthermore, wide variations have been found in the quality of implementation, rolling out and outcomes across different countries.

Date: 13 September 2018

Challenging gender norms to achieve sustainable sanitation

At the beginning of 2018, the CLTS Knowledge Hub based at the Institute of Development Studies released a call for applications for a desk-based study looking at ‘the other side of gender’. The idea came out of discussions with different sanitation and hygiene (WASH) actors who felt that despite gender relations being regarded as socially constructed power relations between men and women, boys and girls - gender in WASH discussions was often being reduced to the roles and experiences of women and sometimes only to menstrual hygiene management (MHM).

Learning Brief: Sanitation and hygiene for all: a comparative study of approaches to leaving no one behind across five countries

In 2017-2018, the Institute for Sustainable Futures - University of Technology Sydney (ISF-UTS) conducted research on SNV’s experience of striving to reach all through the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All (SSH4A) programme in rural areas across five of the 15 countries in which SSH4A is being implemented: Bhutan, Nepal, Cambodia, Zambia and Tanzania.

Date: 30 August 2018
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Learnings from the 41st WEDC Conference

I had the opportunity to attend the 41st WEDC Conference held at Nakuru, Kenya 9 – 13th July 2018 . The theme of the five-day event was, 'Transformation towards sustainable and resilient WASH services'. The power-packed week saw more than 160 presentations, 29 side events, 21 capacity building workshops, exhibitions and posters - there was something for everyone! I was thrilled to interact with participants who were working on diverse themes, but with one common objective. As we all eagerly await next year's conference, here are my reflections on some of my conference highlights.

Reaching the last mile: notions and innovations from the 41st WEDC Conference

The 41st WEDC Conference in Nakuru, Kenya was an open door for Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) practitioners from different organisations and parts of the world to discuss how to reach the 'last mile', how to involve the most vulnerable individuals and communities in open defecation free (ODF) processes, and to debate the design of, and access to, sanitation facilities which adapt to diverse needs, means and contexts.

High-quality shared toilets can reduce women’s feelings of stress due to fear of violence

This two-page policy brief summarises the findings of a qualitative research study which looked at causes and levels of psychosocial stress among users of traditional shared latrines and high-quality shared toilets in informal settlements in Mozambique’s capital city, Maputo. In many slum communities in Africa and Asia, many people live in rental compounds in small rooms that do not have space for private toilets. Such people necessarily rely on shared sanitation facilities.

Date: 26 July 2018
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