equity and inclusion

Nine ideas for Gender Transformative WASH programming

This blog offers advice for practitioners wanting to apply gender transformative approaches to WASH programming. It has been partly adapted from the workshop ‘Gender Transformative WASH’ (April 2019) that the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) co-facilitated with Dr Sue Cavill for Plan International. The workshop was for Plan country-office staff from Ethiopia, Indonesia, Nepal, Uganda and Zambia implementing the ‘WASH SDG Programme’.

Practitioner Tips: Transforming Harmful Gender Norms in WASH with Traditional Leaders

Traditional leaders hold a great amount of power in many communities especially when it comes to influencing social norms. They are important ‘gatekeepers’ who play a vital role in passing on ideas and information to communities. Social norms around gender can be very ‘sticky’ and difficult to change so finding a way to work with traditional leaders can be valuable.

Women’s empowerment: sharpening our focus

What is women’s empowerment? How do you measure it? Why is it relevant to the WASH?

Empowerment, and more specifically women’s empowerment, is among the most fuzzy concepts within international development. This article looks at how it has evolved drawing on key international feminist thinkers, concluding that women’s empowerment is best understood as a process rather than an end goal, where marginalised women are able to set their own political agendas, to access resources, form movements and achieve lasting change in gender and social power structures.

Date: 17 June 2019

Intersectionality: ask the other question

What is intersectionality? How can you apply it in practice? What relevance does it have for WASH?

This short article delves into some of the key proponents and literature that gave rise to the concept of intersectionality, the debates that informed its evolution and use, and shares some insights on how to “ask the other question” to inform more nuanced development approaches.

Date: 17 June 2019

Urban WASH programming in Megacities: Supporting Low Income Communities of Dhaka, Bangladesh

UNICEF Field Note Urban WASH in Megacities

This Field Note forms part of UNICEF’s efforts to document its urban WASH programme experience and expertise, to inform the development of a global urban WASH framework and support the Global WASH Strategy. It focuses on a specific context in urban WASH programming: Low Income Communities (LICs) in megacities. It documents UNICEF’s experiences in provision of WASH services to LICs of Dhaka, Bangladesh.

 

Date: 16 April 2019
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Blog 3 of 3: Accelerating improved sanitation in Africa through market based approaches

Last November UNICEF’s West and Central Africa Regional Office, Supply Division and WASH Programme Division convened a regional sanitation industry consultation in Abuja, Nigeria. The consultation brought together 100+ representatives from industry, financial institutions, governments and development partners. This series of three blogs is based on the discussions held on market shaping – including the current thinking, how it can increase uptake of improved sanitation facilities amongst the poorest households, and how it is being considered at the country level.

The Camissa Multi-Stakeholder Statement on Achieving Access to Adequate and Equitable Sanitation and Hygiene for All and Ending Open Defecation in Africa by 2030

This multi-stakeholder statement emerging from the deliberations during the Fifth Africa Conference on Sanitation and Hygiene held in Cape Town, South Africa, February 18-22, 2019, focuses on progress towards achieving the Vision and Commitments of the Ngor Declaration on Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa.

It sets out the key issues of the sanitation and hygiene sector in Africa (see below) and the specific actions to be taken by each stakeholder group including Local Administrative Authorities, Development Partners, Civil Society, and Private Sector.

Date: 14 March 2019

Water Currents: WASH and Gender

Women and girls often bear primary responsibility for providing drinking water and sanitation within their families and as a result are disproportionately affected when they have to travel to reach these services/facilities and take time to maintain them. Improved sanitation access is crucial to preserving the basic dignity of women and girls and reducing gender-based violence.

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