equity and inclusion

Assessing Women’s Negative Sanitation Experiences and Concerns: The Development of a Novel Sanitation Insecurity Measure

Lack of access to acceptable sanitation facilities can expose individuals, particularly women, to physical, social, and mental health risks. While some of the challenges have been documented, standard metrics are needed to determine the extent to which women have urination- and defecation-related concerns and negative experiences. Such metrics also are needed to assess the effectiveness of interventions to mitigate them. This study developed a sanitation insecurity measure to capture the range and frequency of women’s sanitation-related concerns and negative experiences.

Date: 17 July 2017
Country: 

Health and Hygiene across the Life Course: World Health Assembly 2017 side session report

During the World Health Assembly 2017, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), SCA, Government of Kenya and WaterAid came together to share approaches to ensure good hygiene and health practices and to raise standards across the life course, from childhood to adolescence, from motherhood to menopause, to old age and responding to disabilities. The session took place in the morning on 24 May 2017 at the Intercontinental Hotel in Geneva, and was attended by more than 40 international delegates from UN agencies, private sector, member states, NGOs and academia.

Date: 22 June 2017

How can a program design rural sanitation financial support to reach the most disadvantaged? (Webinar)

Hosted by the Cambodian Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Sub-Group (RuSH), this interactive webinar will discuss how different programs have tried to design rural sanitation subsidies to reach the poorest. Examples will be shared from India, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Cambodia. Rapid presentations will be followed by discussion questions and polls for participants to share their rural sanitation knowledge with others.

'Nothing about us without us!': the Philippines' approach to Zero Open Defecation

Following the workshop facilitated jointly by the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS and UNICEF which looked at how best to support the poorest and most vulnerable in sanitation at scale, the Ministry of Health and UNICEF facilitated a one-day workshop for Government and partners in the Philippines on the 29th May 2017. The purpose of this workshop was to share the learning from the first few days discussions and to consider the opportunities and challenges to applying different subsidy and reward schemes in the context of the Philippines in supporting the poorest.

Untangling complexity: How do we ensure we effectively reach, support and involve the most disadvantaged?

Have had the great opportunity to take part in a workshop organised jointly by the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS and UNICEF, which looked at how best to support the poorest and most vulnerable in sanitation at scale.

The participants included a mix of some of the leading lights and people active in: CLTS and participatory techniques; smart subsidies; and equity and inclusion. It also included representatives of organisations implementing sanitation at scale:

Supporting the rights of girls and women through MHM: Realities, progress and opportunities

This synthesis of the MHM context across the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region has been initiated jointly by the Education and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) teams of the UNICEF East Asia and Pacific Regional Office (EAPRO). It aims to provide an overview of the experiences of girls and women and the current status of MHM programming and action across the region. The main focus has been on the school context linked to WASH in Schools (WinS); but MHM related to out-of-school youth, at community level, in humanitarian contexts and in the workplace have also been included.

Date: 22 May 2017

Supporting the Rights of Girls and Women through MHM in the East Asia and Pacific Region

Women and girls continue to be subjected to multiple challenges when it comes to menstrual hygiene management (MHM), due to things like taboos; norms and practices; a lack of access to accurate information; poor access to sanitary products and poor access to Water Sanitation and Hygiene facilities. The real life consequences of this, can affect a girl’s education, as well as some of her other rights, including her right to equality, health and dignity.

Date: 22 May 2017

What can existing data on water and sanitation tell us about menstrual hygiene management?

Half of the global population menstruate as part of their life cycle. This involves water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) needs that are often overlooked. Experience from the Millennium Development Goals shows that states focus on targets that are measured globally. Data and indicators on menstrual hygiene management (MHM) for women and girls can have a positive impact on raising awareness, national policy making, and in finding sustainable WASH sector solutions.

Date: 22 May 2017

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