Children and schools

Nigeria: Communities Strengthen Sanitation, Move to End Open Defecation in Jigawa

Winifred Ogbebo, who visited some communities in Jigawa state recently, writes on the efforts to end open defecation through strengthened sanitation and good hygiene practices, being championed by the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) with funding from DFID.

Read more on AllAfrica.com 21st October 2013

Annual Progress Report for 'Empowering self-help sanitation of rural and peri-urban communities and schools in Africa'

sanitation sensitisation in a school in Niger
This annual narrative report describes progress against the overall programme objectives and at country level, outlining challenges and lessons learned as part of Plan's eight country Pan African programme.
Date: 30 August 2013

Sanitation and stunting in India: Undernutrition's blind spot

Global proportions of ODF, poverty and undernutrition diagram
The puzzle of persistent undernutrition in India is largely explained by open defecation, population density, and lack of sanitation and hygiene. The impact on nutrition of many faecally-transmitted infections, not just the diarrhoeas, has been a blind spot. In hygienic conditions much of the undernutrition in India would disappear. To tackle undernutrition effectively requires the elimination of open defecation and a radical transformation of sanitation and hygiene policies and practices.
Date: 15 July 2013
Country: 

Childhood Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (Lancet Series)

The Lancet Series on Childhood Pneumonia and Diarrhoea, led by Aga Khan University, Pakistan, provides evidence for integrated control efforts for childhood pneumonia and diarrhoea. The first paper assesses the global burden of these two illnesses, comparing and contrasting them, and includes new estimates of severe disease and updated mortality estimates for 2011. Findings from the second paper show that a set of highly cost-effective interventions can prevent most diarrhoea deaths and nearly two thirds of pneumonia deaths by 2025, if delivered at scale.

Date: 27 April 2013

The long and short of open defecation

There is statistical data to show that the height of Indian children is correlated to their and their neighbourhood’s access to toilets.

You can learn a lot from measuring children’s height. How tall a child has grown by the time she is a few years old is one of the most important indicators of her well-being. This is not because height is important in itself, but because height reflects a child’s early-life health, absorbed nutrition and experience of disease.

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