Children and schools

WASH in Schools Empowers Girls’ Education: Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2013

There is increasing interest in exploring and addressing the menstrual hygiene management (MHM) barriers facing schoolgirls and female teachers in educational settings. Around the globe, WASH in Schools (WinS) focuses on fostering social inclusion and individual self-respect – and addresses MHM as a key agenda. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, integrating MHM into WinS empowers all students, and especially encourages girls and female teachers.

Date: 16 May 2014

The effect of interventions to improve water quality and supply, provide sanitation and promote handwashing with soap on physical growth in children

The Cochrane Review on WASH and Childhood Undernutrition was launched in November 2013. This study was funded by DFID through the SHARE Research Consortium and provides a definitive synthesis of the current evidence relating improvements in drinking water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) to childhood undernutrition.

Date: 15 May 2014

CLTS Week…. Let’s deal with ‘Shit’ in Africa

I am in Lusaka Zambia participating in the Pan African Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) annual Network meeting. The first day was really exciting for me… first because I got to meet enthusiastic CLTS champions from East and West Africa and secondly, this year’s meeting is UNIQUE  because we have participation of the Zambian government staff, partners, and a traditional leader (Chief) from one of the communities where Plan Zambia is implementing CLTS!

A qualitative comparative analysis of well-managed school sanitation in Bangladesh

Continued management of sanitation and hygiene services, post-intervention, is a global challenge, particularly in the school-setting. This situation threatens anticipated impacts of school sanitation and hygiene investments. To improve programming and policies, and increase the effectiveness of limited development
resources, this study seeks to understand how and why some schools have well-managed sanitation post-intervention,
while others do not.

Date: 26 February 2014
Country: 

Are children in West Bengal shorter than children in Bangladesh?

Children in West Bengal and Bangladesh are presumed to share the same distribution of genetic height potential. In West Bengal they are richer, on average, and are therefore slightly taller. However, when wealth is held constant, children in Bangladesh are taller. This gap can be fully accounted for by differences in open defecation, and especially by open defecation in combination with differences in women’s status and maternal nutrition.

Date: 19 February 2014
Country: 

Trigger: Annual Report for the Pan African CLTS project

Trigger 2012 cover
Trigger is an Annual Report for the Pan African project Empowering self-help sanitation of rural and peri-urban communities and schools in Africa. It includes background information about the project, overviews of the 8 countries’ activities, case studies and progress as well as many interesting photos.
Date: 5 February 2014

Growing Tall and Smart with Toilets: Stopping Open Defecation Improves Children’s Height in Cambodia

A new research brief from the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), Investing in the Next Generation: Growing Tall and Smart with Toilets, examines how the level of open defecation in a community is associated with shorter children in Cambodia. Key findings highlighted in the research brief are that open defecation is associated with greater stunting at every age, and that it is associated with greater stunting even when the household itself does not openly defecate.

Date: 19 December 2013
Country: 

Improved Use of Toilets Boosts Childhood Test Scores, Decreases Stunting

Access to improved sanitation can increase cognition in children, according to a new World Bank study. The study contributes to a growing body of research linking stunting and open defecation. Currently, more than 2.5 billion people worldwide lack access to toilets, and one billion people practice open defecation. 

Date: 19 November 2013
Country: 

Children lead Nepal's drive against open-air defecation

For several months last year, Pramala Balami, 14, went out every morning with a group of other children in her village, looking out for people defecating in the open air.

The Children's Club in the Chitlang Village Development Committee in Makwanpur district in central Nepal was one of the groups mobilized by the local authorities in their drive to make their area an open-defecation-free zone.

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