Children and schools

Will Narendra Modi free India from open defecation?

“Has it ever pained us that our mothers and sisters have to defecate in the open?” With these words, the new Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi last week pushed sanitation up the hierarchy of national concerns. Using the solemn speech in the annual commemoration of the Independence Day, Modi announced a new campaign to eliminate open defecation – the practice of people relieving themselves in the open – by 150th anniversary of Gandhi’s birth in 2019.

What do toilets have to do with nutrition? More than you might think

Approximately 160 million children under the age of 5 are stunted. This means they are failing to grow well and lack of height can be a marker of a whole range of developmental setbacks including cognitive impairment. The 2013 Lancet series on maternal and child nutrition confirmed that to reduce stunting we need three things: an enabling environment for political commitment; a scaled-up series of cost-effective nutrition interventions and robust underlying drivers (food security, empowered women and a supportive health environment).

Plan Ethiopia's Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene News, July 2014

Newsletter update from Plan Ethiopia detailing the activities and achievements of their three sanitation and hygiene projects: Scaling up
Community and School Led Total Sanitation (funded by UNICEF), Scaling up Sanitation in Rural, Urban and School areas (funded by Plan Netherlands) and Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability Project (funded by Plan USA).

Read the update

Date: 16 July 2014
Country: 

Linking WASH and nutrition strategies for more sustainable outcomes

The linkages between water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and undernutrition are increasingly recognized by the development community. The vicious cycle between undernutrition and WASH related diseases (such as diarrhea and environmental enteropathy) is more apparent than ever before: children who receive adequate nutritional intake, yet suffer from diseases due to a lack of WASH, aren’t able to fully absorb or take advantage of those calories or nutrients. The cycle continues as those undernourished children are more vulnerable to WASH-related infections. -

Date: 14 July 2014

Poor sanitation in India may affecr well-fed children with malnutrition

In India, a long economic boom has done little to reduce the vast number of cases of malnutrition and stunting in children, leaving them with mental and physical deficits that affect them for the rest of their lives. An emerging body of scientific studies suggest that many of the 162 million children under the age of 5 in the world who are malnourished are suffering less a lack of food than poor sanitation.

Hygiene, Sanitation, and Water: Forgotten Foundations of Health

Every year, around 2.4 million deaths worldwide (4.2% of all deaths) could be prevented if everyone practised appropriate hygiene and had good, reliable sanitation and drinking water. The majority of these deaths are children in developing countries dying from diarrhoea and subsequent malnutrition, and from other diseases attributable to malnutrition.
How is an opportunity to prevent so many deaths (and 6.6% of the global burden of disease in terms of disability-adjusted life years or DALYs failing to attract the attention of the international public health community?

Date: 12 June 2014

Most Rural Girls Skip School During Period

About 95 percent of girls in Ghana, particularly those in rural communities, miss school during their menstrual periods due to the lack of hygienic materials, inconsistent supply of water and soap, inadequate disposal and collection of sanitary products, John Baidoo, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Sustainable Development Focus Limited (SUDEF), a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) has indicated.

WASH in Schools Empowers Girls’ Education: Proceedings of the Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools Virtual Conference 2013

There is increasing interest in exploring and addressing the menstrual hygiene management (MHM) barriers facing schoolgirls and female teachers in educational settings. Around the globe, WASH in Schools (WinS) focuses on fostering social inclusion and individual self-respect – and addresses MHM as a key agenda. By offering an alternative to the stigma and marginalization associated with hygiene issues, integrating MHM into WinS empowers all students, and especially encourages girls and female teachers.

Date: 16 May 2014

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