Children and schools

The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) Trial

Child stunting and anemia are intractable public health problems in developing countries and have profound short- and long-term consequences. The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is motivated by the premise that environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a major underlying cause of both stunting and anemia, that chronic inflammation is the central characteristic of EED mediating these adverse effects, and that EED is primarily caused by high fecal ingestion due to living in conditions of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).

Date: 8 December 2015
Country: 

How do we go beyond 'business as usual'? More reflections from the UNC Conference

Today I continued to follow the conversation about new directions in the over-all system of international WASH development. There is a lot of talk about changing the way aid business is conducted. But it’s hard to say how all this lofty talk will translate into actually useful change. I sensed some frustration on the part of developing country governmental reps and residents. No one’s talking about power dynamics. I also listened to some interesting sanitation reports.

Evaluation of the SOPO School Handwashing Promotion Programme: Nyanza and Rift Valley Provinces, Kenya

Diarrhoea and acute respiratory infection are leading causes of death in Kenyan children (WHO, 2010). In order to move toward Millennium Development Goal 4 to reduce childhood mortality, it is critical to address behaviours that can reduce these infections, eg handwashing with soap. The Kenyan Strategic Plan recommended targeting handwashing programmes to school children because they may be more amenable to behaviour change than adults and because they can act as advocates for behaviour change in their families and communities.
Date: 20 July 2015
Country: 

Following the red thread: menstrual hygiene in Uganda

The CLTS Knowledge Hub has just published the latest issue in the Frontiers series- Breaking the next taboo: Menstrual Hygiene within CLTS.  This issue of Frontiers of CLTS illustrates how Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes can be expanded to address menstrual hygiene management (MHM) in schools and communities to alleviate these stresses on women and girls.

Ensuring Safe Sanitation for Children: Why It's Time to Pay More Attention to Child Feces Disposal

To improve the evidence base, the Global Water Practice’s Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) partnered to develop profiles outlining the current child feces disposal practices of caregivers and existing interventions to improve those practices.
Date: 15 July 2015

Reflections on a field visit to GSF projects in Senegal

In the run up to AfricaSan I joined a Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) field trip and learning event in Matam region, Senegal. Along with Global Sanitation Fund programme managers and WSSCC National Coordinators we visited different villages where local NGOs had been triggering communities. Matam, in the north east of Senegal separated from Mauritania by the Senegal River, has a population of over 550,000 of which 98% are Muslim. In the region 47.2% practice open defecation.

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