Children and schools

Comparing Sanitation Delivery Modalities in Urban Informal Settlement Schools: A Randomized Trial in Nairobi, Kenya

The provision of safely managed sanitation in informal settlements is a challenge, especially in schools that require durable, clean, sex-segregated facilities for a large number of children. In informal settlements in Nairobi, school sanitation facilities demand considerable capital costs, yet are prone to breakage and often unhygienic. The private sector may be able to provide quality facilities and services to schools at lower costs as an alternative to the sanitation that is traditionally provided by the government.

Date: 13 December 2016
Country: 

Disease externalities and net nutrition: Evidence from changes in sanitation and child height in Cambodia, 2005–2010

Child height is an important indicator of human capital and human development, in large part because early life health and net nutrition shape both child height and adult economic productivity and health. Between 2005 and 2010, the average height of children under 5 in Cambodia significantly increased. What contributed to this improvement? Recent evidence suggests that exposure to poor sanitation - and specifically to widespread open defecation - can pose a critical threat to child growth. We closely analyze the sanitation height gradient in Cambodia in these two years.

Date: 13 December 2016
Country: 

Tough Shit: What's the link between diarrhoea and bonded labour?

When we think of bonded labour – the most widespread form of modern slavery - we don't instantly think of diarrhoea, or any health issue for that matter. However, the research that IDS is carrying out on bonded labour in India and Nepal, suggests that diarrhoea and ill-health, poverty, loans and bonded labour are all interlinked.

Final evaluation of Plan's Pan Africa Programme

Between 2010 and 2016, Plan Netherlands implemented a CLTS programme in 8 countries in Africa: Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zambia, Ghana, Sierra Leone and Niger. This programme, although entitled ‘Empowering self-help sanitation of rural and peri-urban communities and schools in Africa’ soon became known as the Pan Africa Programme.

Date: 23 September 2016

Effect of eliminating open defecation on diarrhoeal morbidity: an ecological study of Nyando and Nambale sub-counties, Kenya

Defecating in the open predisposes people to soil transmitted helminthes and diarrhoeal diseases. An estimated 5.6 million Kenyans defecate in the open. Kenya launched a program to eradicate open defecation by 2013 in the rural areas. By end of 2013, only two sub-counties had eliminated open defecation. These are Nambale and Nyando. The study looked at the impact of eradicating open defecation on diarrhea prevalence among children in these two sub-counties.
Date: 9 September 2016
Country: 

Can water, sanitation and hygiene help eliminate stunting? Current evidence and policy implications

Stunting is a complex and enduring challenge with far-reaching consequences for those affected and society as a whole. To accelerate progress in eliminating stunting, broader efforts are needed that reach beyond the nutrition sector to tackle the underlying determinants of undernutrition. There is growing interest in how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions might support strategies to reduce stunting in high-burden settings, such as SouthAsia and sub-SaharanAfrica.

Date: 12 August 2016

Teachers and Sanitation Promotion: An Assessment of Community-Led Total Sanitation in Ethiopia

Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) is a participatory approach to addressing open defecation that has demonstrated success in previous studies, yet there is no research on how implementation arrangements and context change effectiveness. UNC used a quasi-experimental study design to compare two interventions in Ethiopia: conventional CLTS in which health workers and local leaders provided facilitation and an alternative approach in which teachers provided facilitation.

Date: 3 August 2016
Country: 

Call for abstracts for the 5th Virtual Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in WASH in Schools Conference

The 5th Annual Virtual Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) in Schools (WinS) Conference will take place on the 25th October 2016 and will focus on the many ways that girls’ voices are being captured and channeled into action on MHM in schools and in their lives more broadly.

Fronteiras Edição 6: Romper com o Tabu Seguinte: Higiene Menstrual no CLTS

A menstruação é uma parte natural e saudável da vida de mulheres e raparigas, mas é muitas vezes um assunto tabu, de que não se fala com facilidade, o que pode levar a sentimentos de constrangimento e vergonha. Também pode fazer com que as raparigas percam a atenção na escola ou faltem à escola. A menstruação é um elemento central de saneamento e higiene que afecta a metade da população do mundo durante uma grande parte da vida.

Date: 9 May 2016

Multisectoral Approaches to Improving Nutrition: Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Emerging evidence in the WASH sector suggests the linkages between WASH and nutrition may be stronger than previously understood. This has generated a great deal of momentum in both the WASH and nutrition sectors about how the two can work more closely to achieve better outcomes. This paper addresses this objective from both the WASH perspective, on how nutrition-specific programs (as well as nutrition-sensitive social protection, livelihoods, and community-driven development programs) can provide an alternative platform to deliver services at scale and more cost-effectively; and the nutrition perspective, on how WASH interventions can be adapted to include nutritional considerations, making them more nutrition-sensitive, and more impactful on nutrition.
Date: 11 February 2016

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Children and schools