campaigns

Raising awareness on open defecation in Indonesia

Indonesia has a massive problem of open defecation. The WHO/UNICEF JMP reports estimates that there are around 55 million people practicing open defecation in the country, or one quarter approximately of the population. This is the second highest country total, after India. Open defecation is mostly by the poorest populations and they bear the heaviest burden. Children – already vulnerable and marginalized - pay the highest price in respect of their survival and development. This well-established traditional behaviour is deeply ingrained through practice from early childhood.

Action Learning: Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’s missing master key

The number and nature of the many forces that intertwine to trap rural Indians in filth and infections are still not fully recognised. Widespread preference for open defecation (OD), subsidised toilets, corruption, caste and divided communities, concepts of purity, population increase and density, faecally-transmitted infections (FTIs) causing undernutrition (‘shit stunts’), diminishing cognitive ability and damaging immune systems, and the multiple physical and social harms inflicted on women and girls – these are among the forces that interlock as a syndrome - a net, a trap, a prison - escape from which is fiendishly difficult.

Can India's women lead the way to a Swachh Bharat (Clean India)?

I have just had two remarkable weeks in India with the National Rural Livelihoods Mission.  This is a national movement of, so far, 2.4 million women’s self-help groups (SHGs).  Each has about 10 members.  Then there are Village Organisations of SHGs and Federations above them.  I was there to help explore whether these SHGs and their organisations could take a lead in the drive for rural sanitation.  This involved field visits in Telangana (formerly part of Andhra Pradesh) and Bihar, and three brainstorming workshops, the last one at national level in Delhi, convened by the World Bank whic

Impact of Indian Total Sanitation Campaign on Latrine Coverage and Use: A Cross-Sectional Study in Orissa Three Years following Programme Implementation

Article by Sharmani Barnard, Parimita Routray, Fiona Majorin, Rachel Peletz, Sophie Boisson, Antara Sinha, Thomas Clasen in PLoS ONE 8(8): e71438. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0071438 based on research on the impact of the Indian Government's Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) on latrine coverage and use among 20 villages in Orissa. 

Date: 28 April 2014
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The untold story of India’s sanitation failure, Addendum

Three months ago, a paper dealing with the causes of the failure of the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) in India and written by Brian Bell and myself, was published in the journal Water Policy. A very succinct summary: the TSC –the national rural sanitation campaign of India between 1999 and 2012– was a ‘good’ policy on paper, but yielded very poor results. Its valuable core principles –community-led, people-centred, demand-driven and incentive-based– did not happen in practice. The result: millions of latrines ‘planted’ throughout the country without any involvement or appropriation by the ‘beneficiaries’, severely affecting sustainability. We identified five main causes behind the theory-practice gap in the TSC: low political priority; flawed monitoring; distorting accountability and career incentives; technocratic and paternalistic inertia; and corruption.

Osun RUWESA boss campaigns against open defecation

The Project Manager of the Osun Rural Water Environmental Sanitation Agency (RUWESA) Alhaji Posi Adiatu, has enjoined people of Osun State to join hands with the wife of the state governor, who is also the Ambassador of Community-Led Total Sanitation, Alhaja Serifat Abidemi Aregbesola,  in ensuring that open defecation is totally eradicated in the state, as she would not relent in putting efforts to collaborate with the private sector, foreign agencies, government and non-government agencies willing to work with the CLTS programme in the state.

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