behaviour change

Challenges of behaviour change in rural north India

Despite large government and NGO programs, despite substantially increased public spending on sanitation, and despite sustained economic growth, open defecation is declining very, very slowly in rural “Hindi heartland” north India. Widespread resistance to using simple latrines in the rural north Indian plains states is a human development crisis and a serious puzzle: this is exactly the place on earth where open defecation is most common and where high population density most raises the human and economic costs of open defecation.

Date: 28 March 2014
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Behaviour change in sanitation: synopsis from the 13th SanCop meeting (November 2013)

The 13th meeting of the UK’s Sanitation Community of Practice was held on Wednesday 20th November 2013 at Cranfield University. The rationale for the meeting is to draw upon DFID’s 2013 WASH evidence paper, which argues that behaviour change for hygiene and sanitation, especially at scale, is a key evidence gap in the sector. The aims of the day were as follows:

Date: 26 February 2014

No shame in a simple pit latrine

Diane Coffey

Yesterday was my last day with the team in Rewari, Haryana.  Sangita, Nikhil, Nidhi and I had finished up collecting qualitative data to try to understand latrine adoption in the last 10 years.  Thanks to our friendly respondents, many of whom were willing to have their interviews recorded, we have lots of interesting findings about latrine adoption and use, and some really fun quotations.  But the findings of the “switching study” in Haryana will have to wait for another day.

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