behaviour change

Nigeria: Effectiveness and Sustainability of Community-Led Total Sanitation

In Nigeria, diarrheal diseases are the third leading cause of mortality, accounting for over 75,000 deaths of children aged 1-59 months in 2015 (WHO, 2016).  From 2012 to 2016, Action Against Hunger worked with local authorities to trigger 138 communities in Yobe State, Northern Nigeria, using the Community-Led Total Sanitation methodology. The objective of this approach is to empower the community to realise the negative impacts of open defecation on health and well-being, and thus mobilise itself to eliminate open defecation and improve sanitation with limited external intervention.

Date: 1 March 2018
Country: 

Effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing, and nutritional interventions on diarrhoea and child growth in rural Kenya: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

Poor nutrition and exposure to faecal contamination are associated with diarrhoea and growth faltering, both of which have long-term consequences for child health. This trial aimed to assess whether water, sanitation, handwashing, and nutrition interventions reduced diarrhoea or growth faltering.

Date: 26 February 2018
Country: 

Rethinking Rural Sanitation Approaches

A man shows his handwashing station in Nambale

Current rural sanitation practitioners and decision makers are faced with insufficient information on the relative performance of different programming approaches. These approaches are frequently defined either too tightly, or too loosely, which stifles innovation, learning and opportunities to combine and tailor approaches to the changing contexts in which they operate. The cost of facilitating and delivering these approaches is often not well understood or monitored.

Date: 21 February 2018

Mass Behaviour Change Campaigns: what works and what doesn't

The promotion of hygienic behaviour – and particularly handwashing with soap – is one of the most cost-effective health interventions. Yet, despite bringing some of the highest public health returns on investments, hygiene is neglected – in public health interventions, in national and global health policy priorities, and in national and global monitoring frameworks.

Date: 23 November 2017

Promoting handwashing and sanitation behaviour change in low-and middle-income countries

This report by 3ie summarises a systematic review by De Buck and colleagues that examines which promotional approaches are effective in changing handwashing and sanitation behaviour and which implementation factors affect the success or failure of such interventions. The study is the first mixed methods systematic review of behaviour change in sanitation and hygiene, drawing on quantitative and qualitative evidence. It shows that CLTS, in comparison with approaches like social marketing and health messaging, is most effective in improving OD behaviour and latrine use.

Date: 28 September 2017

Norms, nudges, or addiction? Understanding drivers for handwashing behavior change.

Handwashing with soap is one of the most effective ways to prevent diseases, but behavior change to increase handwashing remains a challenge. On September 12, 2017, the Global Handwashing Partnership and USAID hosted a webinar that focused on behavior change approaches for handwashing with soap. The webinar gave participants ideas and perspectives to use on Global Handwashing Day and throughout the year.

Date: 27 September 2017

Habit Formation and Rational Addiction: A Field Experiment in Handwashing

Regular handwashing with soap is believed to have substantial impacts on child health in the developing world. Most handwashing campaigns have failed, however, to establish and maintain a regular practice of handwashing. Motivated by scholarship that suggests handwashing is habitual, This study designed, implemented and analyzed a randomized field experiment aimed to test the main predictions of the rational addiction model. To reliably measure handwashing, the researchers developed and produced a novel soap dispenser, within which a time-stamped sensor is embedded.

Date: 27 July 2017

Switching to sanitation: Understanding latrine adoption in a representative panel of rural Indian households

Open defecation, which is still practiced by about a billion people worldwide, is one of the most compelling examples of how place influences health in developing countries. Efforts by governments and development organizations to address the world's remaining open defecation would be greatly supported by a better understanding of why some people adopt latrines and others do not.

Date: 17 July 2017
Country: 

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