Adaptations and innovations

Blog: AfricaSan 5: Financing sanitation and hygiene in Africa while leaving no one behind

The AfricaSan 5 Conference was recently held in Cape Town, South Africa. Every three years it reunites policy-makers, development partners, donors and the private sector to discuss some of the most compelling issues of the sanitation and hygiene sector in order to look for joint learning, new opportunities and shared paths forward. This post presents some of the main discussions about financing the sector in Africa that were featured during the week and concludes with some reflections on how the sector can be financed while leaving no one behind.

Blog 3 of 3: Accelerating improved sanitation in Africa through market based approaches

Last November UNICEF’s West and Central Africa Regional Office, Supply Division and WASH Programme Division convened a regional sanitation industry consultation in Abuja, Nigeria. The consultation brought together 100+ representatives from industry, financial institutions, governments and development partners. This series of three blogs is based on the discussions held on market shaping – including the current thinking, how it can increase uptake of improved sanitation facilities amongst the poorest households, and how it is being considered at the country level.

Water Currents: WASH and Gender

Women and girls often bear primary responsibility for providing drinking water and sanitation within their families and as a result are disproportionately affected when they have to travel to reach these services/facilities and take time to maintain them. Improved sanitation access is crucial to preserving the basic dignity of women and girls and reducing gender-based violence.

Yadjidé ADISSODA GBEDO parle d'un «pot de défécation» développé localement(Bénin)[English subtitles]

Yadjidé ADISSODA GBEDO (Chef/PAPHyR BENIN parle du processus qui a permis à l’ONG APIC de concevoir et développer localement un pot de défécation pour les personnes à mobilité réduite dans la Commune de Copargo.

English translation: Yadjidé ADISSODA GBEDO (Head / PAPHyR BENIN) talks about the process that allowed the NGO APIC to locally design and develop a defecation pot for people with reduced mobility in the Copargo Commune.

[The interview is in French with English subtitles]

Dr Josué Ibulungu parle d'une stratégie WASH semi-urbaine en RDC [English subtitles]

Dr Josué Ibulungu (Coordinateur du Consortium SWIFT en RDC, Oxfam) parle du développement d’une stratégie semi-urbaine pour l’assainissement, l’hygiène et l’eau en RDC.   Cette stratégie adapte sensiblement l’approche CLTS pour être utilisée dans les zones semi-urbaines.

English translation: Dr Josué Ibulungu (Sustainable WASH in Fragile Contexts (SWIFT) Consortium Coordinator, Oxfam Congo) talks about the development of a semi-urban strategy for sanitation, hygiene and water in Democratic Republic of Congo. This strategy significantly adapts CLTS for use in for semi-urban areas.

Jirani sanitation groups: sustaining open defecation free status in Tanzania

The sustainability of open defecation free (ODF) status in rural areas where toilets frequently collapse is a global concern.  In Tanzania, SNV has developed an innovative approach called Jirani sanitation groups (JSGs). 'Jirani' means neighbour and the approach is based on community support; if a toilet collapses another can be built with the help of neighbours.

Date: 31 January 2019
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