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Case studies

Eight lessons from CLTS at scale through local governments in Uganda

This ‘GSF in focus’ case study presents eight lessons learned from the GSF-supported Uganda Sanitation Fund (USF) programme in coordinating, planning, and implementing CLTS at scale through a decentralized government system. The USF is the largest programme of its kind in Uganda. The programme, which began in 2011, is currently implemented by 30 District Local Governments 2 under the overall management of the Ministry of Health. By September 2016, the USF reported helping over three million people live in open defecation free (ODF) environments.

Date: 17 February 2017
Country: 

Stories of Change: Reflections from SHARE Phase 1

These Stories of Change (SoC) seek to capture and better understand impacts from Phase I of the SHARE consortium, and also include some related work conducted in Phase II. In Phase I, SHARE worked with five main partners: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)/ Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI), and WaterAid.

Date: 8 February 2017

Understanding Determinants of Access to Hygienic Latrines for Rural Households in Vietnam

During 2014 and 2015, three research studies were carried out to examine the drivers and barriers to latrine adoption and the availability of desirable, affordable latrines in rural areas of Vietnam. The findings were used to develop integrated behavior change communication (BCC) and sanitation supply chain strengthening programs in Hoa Binh Province and the Mekong Delta region.

This WSP Learning Note shares insights and lessons.

Date: 20 October 2016
Country: 

Sustainability of ODF Practices in Kenya

Since the launch of the ODF campaign in 2011 UNICEF has supported the Ministry of Health to scale up sanitation activities with CLTS as its core strategy. The Department of  Environmental Health (DEHS) within the ministry has demonstrated strong leadership and is a clear champion for sanitation and hygiene. Sanitation services have been devolved to the county government under the new constitution (2010) and CLTS implementation is now being led by the County Health Teams.

Date: 2 August 2016
Country: 

Using Social Norms Theory to Strengthen CLTS in Southern Madagascar

This Field Note focuses on the southern region of Madagascar and documents how the region is transitioning from a 100% open defecation to a 100% ODF (Open Defecation Free) region. The southern region is one of the poorest regions in the country and characterized by restrictive, traditional beliefs as well as a rigid hierarchy of power and influence, which contribute towards the failure of development projects in this region.

Date: 2 August 2016
Country: 

Mobile Phone-Based Hygiene and Sanitation Promotion in Somalia

Somalia continues to experience one of the most complex humanitarian crises in the world and is one of the most restrictive and insecure environments for humanitarian actors. There is little evidence to show that approaches conventionally used in humanitarian settings, focused on the delivery of hygiene items and mass communication of messages, have resulted in consistent behaviour change.

Date: 2 August 2016
Country: 

First Steps Towards Sanitation Marketing in Ethiopia Using a Human Centred Design Approach

Although CLTSH has had tremendous success since its initial start, only 24% of the population currently has an improved toilet. Traditional unimproved pit latrines made from locally available and affordable materials are low cost and easy to construct, but are not considered hygienic or sustainable as people stop using dirty and smelly toilets or go back to open defecation after their latrines collapse. There is a need and increasing aspiration for an improved latrine based on the recognized benefits: improved toilets are safer (i.e.

Date: 2 August 2016
Country: 

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