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South Asia

Women sports stars to promote sanitation in Jharkhand, India

In a noble move, the state government on Saturday announced the decision to use women sportspersons to promote sanitation and hygiene in Jharkhand. Deputy chief minister Hemant Soren, who is in-charge of the drinking water and sanitation department, said the department had already taken a decision and the officials would soon prepare a list of women sportspersons, including those who were not active today but have brought laurels to country and the state in national and international events in the past.

A hypothesis on the monitoring system in India’s Total Sanitation Campaign

One of the problems of the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) in India has been its flawed monitoring system. The sanitation sector internationally was shocked when recently the sanitation coverage data from the Census were published. The worst fears were surpassed. Between 2001 and 2011, the TSC reported a sanitation increase of 46 points; from 22% to 68%. However, coverage was only 31% in 2011 according to the Census (GoI 2012a). This raises questions about the TSC monitoring system –and about the TSC policy itself, too.

Pakistan must not overlook defecation problem

Uttering the word ‘defecation’ is often considered impolite. People say ‘going to the back’ and ‘folding legs’. Many people also ask where to wash their hands rather than where the toilet is, avoiding the ‘dirty’ word for the sake of politeness. While talking openly about defecation may cause discomfort or embarrassment, it is a topic we all need to discuss.

Pakistan must not overlook defecation problem

Uttering the word ‘defecation’ is often considered impolite. People say ‘going to the back’ and ‘folding legs’. Many people also ask where to wash their hands rather than where the toilet is, avoiding the ‘dirty’ word for the sake of politeness. While talking openly about defecation may cause discomfort or embarrassment, it is a topic we all need to discuss.

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