East Asia and Pacific

Business Development Services for Sanitation Enterprises in Cambodia

Despite significant progress in increasing sanitation uptake in Cambodia, 60% of the country’s rural population still practices open defecation. Both the Government of Cambodia and a range of development agencies are working to address the issue. Development organisations are present in many provinces (15 of 25), and major achievements have been made in expanding access to sanitation in recent years. A commonly employed approach is sanitation marketing, working through small-scale enterprises to deliver products and services in rural areas.

Date: 4 January 2018
Country: 

Gender Equality and Disability Inclusion within water, sanitation and hygiene

This discussion paper was developed by, and is the result of, a collaboration between WaterAid, CBM Australia and Di Kilsby Consulting. It is based on reflections on applying integrated gender and disability advisory support to rightsbased water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programs in Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea.

Date: 4 January 2018

Enabling Factors for Sustaining Open Defecation-Free Communities in Rural Indonesia: A Cross-Sectional Study

Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS) programmes, like the Sanitasi Total Berbasis Masyarakat (STBM) programme of the Government of Indonesia, have played a significant role in reducing open defecation though still little is known about the sustainability of the outcomes. This study assessed the sustainability of verified Open Defecation Free (ODF) villages and explored the association between slippage occurrence and the strength of social norms through a government conducted cross-sectional data collection in rural Indonesia.

Date: 3 January 2018
Country: 

'Nothing about us without us!': the Philippines' approach to Zero Open Defecation

Following the workshop facilitated jointly by the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS and UNICEF which looked at how best to support the poorest and most vulnerable in sanitation at scale, the Ministry of Health and UNICEF facilitated a one-day workshop for Government and partners in the Philippines on the 29th May 2017. The purpose of this workshop was to share the learning from the first few days discussions and to consider the opportunities and challenges to applying different subsidy and reward schemes in the context of the Philippines in supporting the poorest.

Menstrual hygiene management in Indonesia: understanding practices, determinants and impacts among adolescent school girls

In Indonesia, there is little context specific research about MHM among adolescent girls, including in the school setting. Consequently, the determinants and impacts of MHM among girls and women in Indonesia are not well understood and an evidence-base for programming and interventions to improve MHM is lacking. This 2015 study aimed to explore factors related to MHM knowledge, attitudes, practices and impacts amongst adolescent school girls in Indonesia.

Date: 22 May 2017
Country: 

WASH challenges to girls’ menstrual hygiene management in Metro Manila, Masbate, and South Central Mindanao, Philippines

This paper examines water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions that enable and hinder Philippine schoolgirls to hygienically manage their menstruation. We collected qualitative data from 13 schools in three regions of the Philippines. Schools in both urban (Metro Manila) and rural areas (Masbate and South Central Mindanao) were included to allow for comparison across settings.

Date: 22 May 2017
Country: 

Supporting the rights of girls and women through MHM: Realities, progress and opportunities

This synthesis of the MHM context across the East Asia and Pacific (EAP) region has been initiated jointly by the Education and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) teams of the UNICEF East Asia and Pacific Regional Office (EAPRO). It aims to provide an overview of the experiences of girls and women and the current status of MHM programming and action across the region. The main focus has been on the school context linked to WASH in Schools (WinS); but MHM related to out-of-school youth, at community level, in humanitarian contexts and in the workplace have also been included.

Date: 22 May 2017

Supporting the Rights of Girls and Women through MHM in the East Asia and Pacific Region

Women and girls continue to be subjected to multiple challenges when it comes to menstrual hygiene management (MHM), due to things like taboos; norms and practices; a lack of access to accurate information; poor access to sanitary products and poor access to Water Sanitation and Hygiene facilities. The real life consequences of this, can affect a girl’s education, as well as some of her other rights, including her right to equality, health and dignity.

Date: 22 May 2017

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