East Asia and Pacific

Toilet revolution in China

The widespread prevalence of unimproved sanitation technologies has been a major cause of concern for the environment and public health, and China is no exception to this. Towards the sanitation issue, toilet revolution has become a buzzword in China recently. This paper elaborates the backgrounds, connotations, and actions of the toilet revolution in China. The toilet revolution aims to create sanitation infrastructure and public services that work for everyone and that turn waste into value.

Date: 9 November 2018
Country: 

Working with Women in Rohingya Refugee Camps to Make Toilets Safer

In the world’s largest camp, Rohingya refugees are now living in sprawling and cramped conditions in makeshift shelters made from bamboo and plastic tarpaulin. Finding suitable space to build toilets and washing facilities has proved extremely challenging. More than a third of women surveyed by Oxfam said they did not feel safe or comfortable going to collect water or using toilets and shower cubicles –many of which lack a roof and a lockable door.

WASH Experiences of Women Living with Disabilities in Cambodia

Cambodia’s access to basic water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) remains low compared to other Southeast Asian countries despite improvements over the last decade. There is limited documentation about the WASH experiences of women with disabilities in Cambodia, for which this publication recommends paying greater attention to the issue.

 

Key messages within this eight-page brief:

Date: 13 September 2018
Country: 

Fostering Collective Action to Improve Sanitation in Rural Cambodia

Rural Cambodia is home to the largest proportion of individuals practicing open defecation in Southeast Asia. The Cambodia Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Improvement Program (CRSHIP) has sought to address harmful sanitation practices by increasing access to improved sanitation and promoting proper hygiene in rural target areas.

Date: 13 September 2018
Country: 

Learning Brief: Ensuring Child Safety During and After CLTS

Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) has been implemented in Cambodia since 2005 as a means of improving sanitation and hygiene practices in rural communities, and mobilising them to achieve open defecation free (ODF) status. In CLTS, children are often encouraged to be change agents to help influence their family and community to improve sanitation and hygiene behaviors. However, some strategies may pose a risk to child safety.

Date: 11 June 2018
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Business Development Services for Sanitation Enterprises in Cambodia

Despite significant progress in increasing sanitation uptake in Cambodia, 60% of the country’s rural population still practices open defecation. Both the Government of Cambodia and a range of development agencies are working to address the issue. Development organisations are present in many provinces (15 of 25), and major achievements have been made in expanding access to sanitation in recent years. A commonly employed approach is sanitation marketing, working through small-scale enterprises to deliver products and services in rural areas.

Date: 4 January 2018
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Gender Equality and Disability Inclusion within water, sanitation and hygiene

This discussion paper was developed by, and is the result of, a collaboration between WaterAid, CBM Australia and Di Kilsby Consulting. It is based on reflections on applying integrated gender and disability advisory support to rightsbased water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) programs in Timor-Leste and Papua New Guinea.

Date: 4 January 2018

Enabling Factors for Sustaining Open Defecation-Free Communities in Rural Indonesia: A Cross-Sectional Study

Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS) programmes, like the Sanitasi Total Berbasis Masyarakat (STBM) programme of the Government of Indonesia, have played a significant role in reducing open defecation though still little is known about the sustainability of the outcomes. This study assessed the sustainability of verified Open Defecation Free (ODF) villages and explored the association between slippage occurrence and the strength of social norms through a government conducted cross-sectional data collection in rural Indonesia.

Date: 3 January 2018
Country: 

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