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East and Southern Africa

How Time Flies: Project Malio approaches its halfway point!

Azafady UK’s three-year sanitation and hygiene initiative, Project Malio, has recently reached its halfway point promoting sustained behavior change and latrine use in the coastal town of Fort Dauphin, southeast Madagascar. Using an adapted version of the Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) methodology, Project Malio aims to eliminate – or at the very least significantly reduce – open defecation in Fort Dauphin by working with households, schools, communities and local government.

Project Malio- adapting rural CLTS to an urban setting in Madagascar

Azafady UK’s three-year sanitation and hygiene initiative, Project Malio, in the coastal town of Fort Dauphin, southeast Madagascar, is using an adapted version of CLTS Sanitation. Azafady have been working with households, schools, communities and local governments to promote sustained latrine use and behaviour change. Since the start of the project, over 1,780 people have been triggered to make community-wide sanitation changes following their recognition that just one person openly defecating can put the entire community at risk of disease.

Date: 15 December 2015
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Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability: Uganda Learning Brief

Plan International supports Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) implementation in a number of sub-counties in Uganda. This learning brief reviews Plan International’s CLTS activities in Uganda. It was found that Plan Uganda contributed to national policies and guidelines and a model for engaging local health officials and entrepreneurs.

Date: 10 December 2015
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The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) Trial

Child stunting and anemia are intractable public health problems in developing countries and have profound short- and long-term consequences. The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is motivated by the premise that environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a major underlying cause of both stunting and anemia, that chronic inflammation is the central characteristic of EED mediating these adverse effects, and that EED is primarily caused by high fecal ingestion due to living in conditions of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).

Date: 8 December 2015
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From AfricaSan to MalawiSan: Using international resolutions to encourage CLTS in Malawi

In May 2015, all roads led to Dakar where the 4th AfricaSan Conference with the theme ‘Achieving universal access to adequate and sustainable sanitation and hygiene services and eliminating open defecation by 2030’ was held. The event was organized by the Ministers and Heads of Delegations responsible for sanitation and hygiene in Africa, together with senior civil servants, academics, civil society, development partners and the private sector.

Sanitation in Small Towns: Experience from Mozambique

WASH services in small towns are frequently neglected by all branches of government due to lack of capacity, unclear mandates, low budgets and lack of feasible options to provide services. Typical high-tech infrastructure solutions are neither feasible nor affordable for these contexts. Progress towards MDG- and sanitation-specific targets in sub-Saharan Africa is much higher in urban areas. However such achievements often mask a disparity between the rich and poor in urban contexts and between major urban cities and small towns or rural centres.

Date: 20 July 2015
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Evaluation of the SOPO School Handwashing Promotion Programme: Nyanza and Rift Valley Provinces, Kenya

Diarrhoea and acute respiratory infection are leading causes of death in Kenyan children (WHO, 2010). In order to move toward Millennium Development Goal 4 to reduce childhood mortality, it is critical to address behaviours that can reduce these infections, eg handwashing with soap. The Kenyan Strategic Plan recommended targeting handwashing programmes to school children because they may be more amenable to behaviour change than adults and because they can act as advocates for behaviour change in their families and communities.
Date: 20 July 2015
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