East and Southern Africa

Nipo Tayari (I am ready) - Tanzania's national sanitation campaign song

In his interview Anyitike Mwakitalima (Tanzania National Sanitation Campaign Coordinator) talks on promoting sanitation behaviour change in Tanzania through a national campaign.

He tells us an important part of the behaviour change strategy is using engaging forms of media to spread the campaign messages. In this spirit a campaign song has been released called ‘Nipo Tayari’ which translates to ‘I am ready’, which you can listen to here!

Promoting sanitation behaviour change in Tanzania

Anyitike Mwakitalima (Tanzania National Sanitation Campaign Coordinator) talks about the second phase of the campaign (2016 - 2020) that focuses on promoting drivers for nationwide behaviour change to improve household and public facility sanitation across the country.

An important part of the campaign is 'Nipo Tayari (I am ready)', Tanzania's national sanitation campaign song. Listen to it here!

Developing a Beach and Island Sanitation Strategy

Jane Bevan (Rural WASH Manager, UNICEF, Ethiopia) talks about the development of a Beach and Island Sanitation Strategy based on her research with fishing communities around Lake Victoria in Siaya county, Kenya. For more information on the research and strategy please contact Andrew Trevett (Chief of WASH in Kenya, UNICEF) atrevett@unicef.org

This interview was filmed at the East and Southern Africa Regional Sharing and Learning Workshop on CLTS and Rural Sanitation 16 – 20 April 2018, Arusha, Tanzania.

Institutional triggering for improved sanitation in Uganda

Mujuni Kitimbo Jimmy (Field Officer, Ministry of Health, Uganda) talks about successes using ‘Institutional Triggering - an Advocacy Tool’ with Community Leaders resulting in improved sanitation for communities in Uganda.

This interview was filmed at the East and Southern Africa Regional Sharing and Learning Workshop on CLTS and Rural Sanitation 16 – 20 April 2018, Arusha, Tanzania.

The event was organised by the CLTS Knowledge Hub with support from SNV Tanzania. It was funded by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida).

How does Community-Led Total Sanitation affect latrine ownership? A quantitative case study from Mozambique

Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) is a widely used, community-based approach to tackle open defecation and its health-related problems. Although CLTS has been shown to be successful in previous studies, little is known about how CLTS works.

Date: 10 May 2018
Country: 

Learnings from our East and Southern Africa workshop

This blog post is on reaching the 'last mile' and moving up the sanitation ladder - learnings that emerged from the East and Southern Africa Sharing and Learning Workshop. At the recent CLTS Knowledge Hub regional sharing and learning workshop held in Arusha 16-20 April, it was encouraging to see that the discourse and programming in the region has matured since the early days of CLTS (and early days of these sharing and learning workshops!).

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Unites Communities in War-Torn South Sudan

This article looks at the response of USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) to the current water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) crisis affecting over four million people, both those internally displaced within South Sudan and refugees populations who have fled to neighbouring countries. It looks at how collaborative WASH projects are uniting communities as well as improving health and safety.

Effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing, and nutritional interventions on diarrhoea and child growth in rural Kenya: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

Poor nutrition and exposure to faecal contamination are associated with diarrhoea and growth faltering, both of which have long-term consequences for child health. This trial aimed to assess whether water, sanitation, handwashing, and nutrition interventions reduced diarrhoea or growth faltering.

Date: 26 February 2018
Country: 

Menstrual Cups and Reusable Pads Are Literally Changing Lives Uganda’s Refugee Camps

Menstrual hygiene management is a challenge for many women across Africa. Sanitary pads are expensive, meaning many women use rags or even leaves to protect their underwear, putting them at greater risk of infection. A lack of sanitation at schools leads to many girls staying home during their periods or dropping out altogether when they start menstruating.

According to one 2016 study, over 90 percent of Ugandan primary schoolgirls struggle with maintaining their menstrual hygiene.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - East and Southern Africa