East and Southern Africa

Emotional demonstrations (emo-demos) of handwashing with soap at vaccination centres

Emotional demonstrations (emo-demos) are used in behaviour-centred design to trigger behaviour changes, such as handwashing with soap, by creating disgust and shame. This eight-page case study presents the emo-demo for triggering behaviour changes at vaccination centres, which were found to be ideal places to raise awareness of the importance of washing hands with soap among pregnant women, mothers and caregivers.

Date: 31 January 2019
Country: 

Hunter-Gatherer notes

The Hunter-Gatherer process:

Hunter-gathering is a participatory process of rapidly collecting and collating information, experiences and contributions. In the two regional Africa workshops we facilitated in 2018, hunter-gatherers self-selected a sanitation topic they were most interested in championing and worked together in small self-selected groups. During the week the groups collected information by taking notes in relevant sessions, interviewing key people and informally through chatting in breaks and meals.

Hunter-Gatherer notes:

Key messages from East and Southern Africa workshop

REACHING THE ‘LAST MILE’ - LEAVING NO ONE BEHIND!

‘Last Mile’ groups are those who are not currently reached by sanitation and hygiene programmes (or not able to sustain improved sanitation and hygiene behaviours) due to challenging contexts they live in or because they are vulnerable in some way. In this workshop, participants identified the ‘Last Mile’ in East and Southern Africa as populations with:

Blog: Ways forward for rural sanitation in Africa

The CLTS Knowledge Hub  has had a busy year! We have hosted and facilitated two regional rural sanitation workshops in Africa.

Read this blog on the approach, challenges and sucsesses of the two events  - including learning briefs on both events available in Enlgish and French.

(This blog is published on the Institute of Develoment Studies (IDS) website.)

State of Hygiene in Southern Africa

Without good hygiene practices, such as toilet use, handwashing with soap, water treatment, food hygiene, and menstrual hygiene, the benefits of other poverty reduction strategies will be undermined, and human dignity will be compromised.

The State of Hygiene in Southern Africa study was commissioned to gather evidence regarding: the status of hygiene practice in the region; the enabling environment and institutional arrangements for the promotion of hygiene behavior change; and key policy and programme bottlenecks for the prioritisation of hygiene.

Date: 15 October 2018

High-quality shared toilets can reduce women’s feelings of stress due to fear of violence

This two-page policy brief summarises the findings of a qualitative research study which looked at causes and levels of psychosocial stress among users of traditional shared latrines and high-quality shared toilets in informal settlements in Mozambique’s capital city, Maputo. In many slum communities in Africa and Asia, many people live in rental compounds in small rooms that do not have space for private toilets. Such people necessarily rely on shared sanitation facilities.

Date: 26 July 2018
Country: 

Fatal dangers of poorly maintained school pit latrines in South Africa

This BBC news article tells the tragic story of a five-year-old boy, Michael Komape, drowning in a poorly maintained school pit latrine in northern South Africa in 2014. It highlights a serious national problem: less than a fifth of schools have access to a latrine and where they do many have been found to be unsafe, which has resulted in another similar tragic death of a young girl this year.

Is Community-Led Total Sanitation connected to the rebuilding of latrines? Quantitative evidence from Mozambique

To reduce open defecation, many implementers use the intervention strategies of Community-
Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), which focuses on initial latrine construction rather than ongoing latrine maintenance, repair and rebuilding. However using data from a cross-sectional survey, this article shows how physical, personal, social context and psychosocial factors from the RANAS model (risks, attitudes, norms, abilities, and self-regulation) are associated with participation in CLTS interventions, and how these factors connect to ongoing latrine maintenance and rebuilding.

Date: 11 June 2018
Country: 

Gaining new insights into CLTS and rural WASH from field visits to Babati and Karatu districts, Tanzania

Sanitation practitioners attending the East and Southern African Regional CLTS and rural sanitation workshop visited the districts of Babati and Karatu, in the north east of Tanzania, in April 2018 to discuss the implementation of CLTS and WASH approaches under the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for all (SSH4A) project run by SNV in partnership with the Government of Tanzania (GoT) and the UK's Department for International Develo

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