WSSCC

Changing hearts and minds to leave no one behind: Sanitation Action Summit 2016

To support and accelerate the objectives of the Swachh Bharat Mission India, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) along with Global Citizen India, the Government of India, and the Government of Maharashtra, created a platform for listening and learning during the Sanitation Action Summit held in Mumbai on 18 November 2016.

Date: 12 January 2017
Country: 

Gender and CLTS: CLTS engagement, outcomes and empowerment in Malagasy communities

Gender equality, serving the most vulnerable, and addressing the particular needs of women and girls are among the core principles of the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF). Since its launch in 2008 by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), the GSF has been committed to these principles in the sanitation and hygiene behaviour change programmes it supports. However, challenges have been identified in sufficiently addressing these principles, such as disaggregating data by gender to assess progress.

Date: 5 December 2016
Country: 

Sanitation and Hygiene Behaviour Change at Scale: Understanding Slippage

As sanitation and hygiene programmes mature, the challenge shifts from bringing communities to ODF status to sustaining this status. In this context, many programmes are confronted with the issue of slippage. This concept refers to a return to previous unhygienic behaviours, or the inability of some or all community members to continue to meet all ODF criteria
Date: 20 October 2016

Catalytic Programming for Scale and Sustainability: Conversations, reflections and lessons from the 2016 GSF Learning Event

The 2016 GSF Learning Event primarily focused on the three core considerations for GSF-supported programmes: scale, sustainability and equality. A key aspect in this regard is what success looks like for GSF-supported programmes, and how these programmes evolve to achieve this success
Date: 13 October 2016

Hygiene Matters

The Hygiene Matters report is based on a survey with 12,000 respondents in twelve countries and explores three themes: an economic perspective on the value of hygiene, a social perspective focused on taboos and stereotypes around hygiene and the role hygiene will play in social and economic development in emerging and developed markets in the future.
Date: 13 October 2016

Who is managing the post-ODF process in the community? A case study from Nambale

Post-ODF follow up is central to sustaining ODF status, and needs to be integrated into CLTS programming from the outset. This paper explores who is to carry out these activities and how they might be motivated and financed. It argues for the importance of identifying existing administrative and social structures prior to implementation.

Date: 5 September 2016
Country: 

Follow up MANDONA: Guidelines for Practitioners

Follow-up MANDONA (FUM) is an action-oriented approach to accelerate the end of open defecation after the initial CLTS triggering session. Based on CLTS principles, FUM involves a series of facilitated sessions with the entire community to reinforce behaviour change and collectively undertake small, immediate and doable actions to become ODF in the shortest time possible.

The Global Sanitation Fund in Madagascar has developed this field guide for accelerating and sustaining open defecation free communities through CLTS.

Date: 31 August 2016
Country: 

Notes for Convening, Facilitating and Following up on Rapid Action Learning and Sharing Workshops

These notes are based on experience convening, facilitating and following up on rural sanitation workshops in India in the past few years.  The most recent has been in Bhopal in August 2015. There it was in support of the Government’s policy in rural sanitation of Rapid Action Learning and Sharing.  The focus was on identifying and sharing innovations.

Date: 14 October 2015
Country: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - WSSCC