WSP

Partnering on the Road Towards Achieving Total Sanitation in East Africa

In East Africa, access to basic sanitation remains low, and intensive work is needed across the region to achieve sustained scaling up of sanitation. Determining how governments and non-governmental agencies can work together more effectively to achieve this goal is essential. This Learning Note highlights a learning exchange held for representatives from the Government of Tanzania and six non-governmental organizations. An initial outcome included consensus on a set learning questions to expand the knowledge base in areas such as equity and inclusion, sanitation marketing, and monitoring and evaluation.
WSP, November 2011

Date: 15 November 2011

Learning by Doing: Working at Scale in Ethiopia

In 2006, WSP partnered with the Government of Ethiopia, the Amhara Regional Health Bureau, and USAID’s Hygiene Improvement Project (HIP) to launch the Learning by Doing Initiative in Amhara Regional State, focused on achieving total behavior change in sanitation and hygiene. The project started at scale, reaching an initial 93,000 households in four districts (estimated population of 418,000) and then expanded further to include an additional 90 districts. Overall, 5.8 million people were reached and 2.8 million more people stopped practicing open defecation and now use an open pit latrine. Key strategies discussed included building capacity at the community level and developing and testing tools and training manuals.

Date: 7 October 2011
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Factors Associated with Achieving and Sustaining Open Defecation Free Communities: Learning from East Java

Research conducted in 2010 in East Java to identify factors associated with achieving and sustaining behavior change by communities to become ODF shows that communities achieving ODF status within two months of triggering achieved markedly higher access gains. In addition, evidence from environmental observation, latrine ownership records, reported usage, and observation of facility maintenance show that 95 percent of the quickly ODF communities had sustained their behavior change 4 to 28 months after ODF declaration. Factors associated with quickly ODF communities include high social capital, high-quality CLTS triggering, access to latrine supplies, easy payment terms, absence of external subsidy packages to a few households out of all, and regular monitoring. These quickly ODF communities represent the most efficient model for scaling up sustainably.
Nilanjana Mukherjee (WSP, 2011)

Date: 5 October 2011
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WSP Videos on CLTS in Indonesia

WSP has released three films that look at CLTS and Sanitation Marketing in Indonesia

Unleashing latent demand for sanitation 

Filmed in Indonesia, this video features how Scaling Up Rural Sanitation began campaigns to raise consumer demand for sanitation amid competing priorities among community members. Why would you want to spend 15 percent of your annual income on something that you felt you did not need?

Date: 22 September 2011
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Sanitation demand and supply in Cambodia: Identifying Constraints to Increasing Sanitation Coverage

WSP Fieldnote October 2008

This field note summarizes research from two studies undertaken in rural and peri-urban areas of Cambodia; one on the demand for latrines among consumers, and the other on the supply of latrines by the private sector. It provides discussion on the opportunity to increase latrine purchase and installation via market forces, and outlines the recommended interventions on both the demand and supply dimensions of the market to achieve this.

Date: 24 November 2009
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