USAID

Market-based sanitation: follow up from an AfricaSan side session

Many markets for sanitation goods and services in low-income countries remain poorly developed, calling for better quality programming at scale, and presenting opportunities for new approaches and partnerships. At AfricaSan5, UNICEF, USAID and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened a side event that explored recent evidence and practice examples.

Date: 16 April 2019

Water Currents: WASH and Gender

Women and girls often bear primary responsibility for providing drinking water and sanitation within their families and as a result are disproportionately affected when they have to travel to reach these services/facilities and take time to maintain them. Improved sanitation access is crucial to preserving the basic dignity of women and girls and reducing gender-based violence.

Scaling Market-Based Sanitation: Desk Review on Market-Based Rural Sanitation Development Programs

The scale of investment required to deliver sanitation goods and services to those who lack access is beyond the capacity of public finance alone. The private sector has already proven itself a key player in the financing, construction, and operation of municipal water supply and wastewater systems in both developed and developing world settings, and has a significant role to play in the provision of onsite sanitation.

Date: 4 February 2019

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Unites Communities in War-Torn South Sudan

This article looks at the response of USAID’s Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) to the current water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) crisis affecting over four million people, both those internally displaced within South Sudan and refugees populations who have fled to neighbouring countries. It looks at how collaborative WASH projects are uniting communities as well as improving health and safety.

Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature (WASHpals)

The USAID Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project conducted a review of the scientific and grey literature, complemented by dozens of key informant interviews with researchers and field implementers, to synthesize the latest understanding of key pathways of fecal microbe ingestion by IYC and their links to diarrhea, EED, and poor nutrition and development outcomes.
Specifically, the review sought to:

Date: 21 February 2018

In Mali, Communities Take Health and Well-Being into their Own Hands

In the center of Simaye village in Mali’s Mopti Region, men, women, and children gather under a large tree to listen. Two USAID-trained facilitators discuss the health challenges facing the village. Only three latrines serve many families, so more than half of the people are practicing open defecation; the water point no longer functions, so most families are pulling dirty water from the river; many of the infants and young children are not benefitting from exclusive breastfeeding or a diversified diet, so they are malnourished.

How can a program design rural sanitation financial support to reach the most disadvantaged? (Webinar)

Hosted by the Cambodian Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Sub-Group (RuSH), this interactive webinar will discuss how different programs have tried to design rural sanitation subsidies to reach the poorest. Examples will be shared from India, Bangladesh, Vietnam and Cambodia. Rapid presentations will be followed by discussion questions and polls for participants to share their rural sanitation knowledge with others.

Lessons Learned: Hybrid CLTS Approach to Improving Sanitation

USAID’s Ghana Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (GWASH) Project aimed to improve rural sanitation access through the provision of household latrines to households in targeted communities. In the beginning of the project, GWASH used a “high-subsidy” approach for household latrine provision, providing households with a 60 percent subsidy per latrine. It was in this vein that GWASH aimed to meet its project target of constructing 4,680 household latrines over the course of a four-year period.

Date: 6 April 2017
Country: 

CLTS Monitoring and Evaluation Toolkit and Manual (Botswana)

The CLTS process in Botswana has reached a point in its implementation through USAID's SAREP Programme (South Africa Region Environmental Programme) that it is now possible to introduce monitoring, evaluation (M&E) and ODF verification and Certification processes into the training. This toolkit and manual contains all forms and materials that are need for a CLTS monitoring team to be established in communities. It is aimed at CLTS facilitators and Natural Leaders who wish to take the next step in ensuring their community becomes Open Defecation Free (ODF).

Date: 23 September 2016
Country: 

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