UNICEF

Key Findings of a Sanitation Supply Chains Study in Eastern and Southern Africa- UNICEF Technical Brief

Access to improved sanitation is still a major challenge in the 21 countries of the Eastern and Southern Africa Region (ESAR): nearly a quarter of the population practices open defecation and 40% use unimproved latrines. The challenge is twofold: changing behaviors towards adopting improved sanitation practices, and providing a supply chain of services and materials for building latrines for the rural population. This technical brief is based on the main findings of a report commissioned by UNICEF entitled “Regional Supply Chains for Sanitation in Eastern and Southern Africa”.
Date: 9 February 2015

CLTS in Fragile and Insecure Contexts: Experience from Somalia and South Sudan- UNICEF WASH Field Note

This Field Note describes the experiences of implementing CLTS programmes in the fragile states contexts of South Sudan and Somalia, with recommendations on where the approach needs to be adapted to be applied in these settings.
Date: 9 February 2015
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Nigeria: Rescue From Diseases Through Water, Sanitation, Hygiene

The Guardian visited some of the Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) and Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) projects in Anambra state, which were commissioned by the United Nation Children Fund (UNICEF) with support from European Union (EU). The Guardian investigation revealed that the WASH programme and CLTS are very good and have reduced water borne diseases as well as met targets.

Gender Issues in Water and Sanitation Programmes: Lessons from India

With around 70% of India’s 1.2 billion people living in rural areas and still suffering the burden of sub-optimal water provision as well the indignity of poor/no sanitation, the job of providing water, sanitation and hygiene for the household invariably falls on women. The UN Commission on Sustainable Development has very aptly affirmed that ‘water has a woman’s face’.

Raising awareness on open defecation in Indonesia

Indonesia has a massive problem of open defecation. The WHO/UNICEF JMP reports estimates that there are around 55 million people practicing open defecation in the country, or one quarter approximately of the population. This is the second highest country total, after India. Open defecation is mostly by the poorest populations and they bear the heaviest burden. Children – already vulnerable and marginalized - pay the highest price in respect of their survival and development. This well-established traditional behaviour is deeply ingrained through practice from early childhood.

3rd Annual Virtual Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in WASH in Schools (WinS) Conference

Hosted by Columbia University and UNICEF on October 29, 2014, the 3rd Annual Virtual MHM Conference will provide an opportunity to share lessons learned with the WinS community around the world, with a particular focus on MHM programming in WinS in various contexts.

New Sanitation Campaign Aims to End Cholera in Haiti

UNICEF and the Haitian government have intensified the fight against cholera, with the launch this week of the National Sanitation Campaign, aiming to eliminate open defecation in the country. The National Sanitation Campaign will target 55 communities in the 10 departments, covering 3.8 million people, 2,500 schools and 500 health centres. The "Community-Led Total Sanitation" (CLTS) approach encourages behaviour change and leadership at community level. It has already been used successfully in three departments.

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