UNICEF

WASH Pathway of Change after Yolanda - One Year On

Embedded in the Philippines National Sanitation Roadmap, PhATS (Philippines Approach to Total Sanitation) was developed in a comprehensive governmental consultation process led by the WASH cluster following the devastating impact of Typhoon Yolanda/Hayan affecting hundreds of thousands of people in 2013. It provides a holistic systemic planning and implementation framework not only focusing on basic sanitation with an incremental phased Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) component reaching out to about a million affected people.

Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

PhATS Newsletter 1: April 2015

This first issue of the PhATS newsletter explains what PhATS is, discusses good governance as part of the enabling environment for sanitation efforts, outlines the phased approach adopted by PhATS, shares the experience of religious leaders working together around WASH disaster risk reduction and maps out the progress with ‘zero open defecation’ (the equivalent of ODF) so far.
Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

PhATS Newsletter 2: May 2015

The second issue of the PhATS Newsletter looks at participatory demand creation, elaborates on models of success for ‘zod’ (zero open defecation), highlights the role of community campaigns around events such as Global Handwashing Day and World Toilet Day, shares experiences with women’s involvement in improving village sanitation and further maps ‘zod’ progress in the Philippines.
Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

PhATS Fieldnote: The Samaritan’s Purse SanMark Approach

The supply component of the Philippines Approach to Total Sanitation (PhATS) aims to strengthen local supply chains for sanitation and hygiene goods and services and encourage Sanitation Marketing (SanMark). Through SanMark, suppliers and service providers market their goods and services to rural households, with the aim of increasing demand, improving
supply and achieving greater sales and profits.

Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

PhATS Technical Note: Sanitation Marketing -Low Cost Sanitation Products

The Philippines Approach to Total Sanitation (PhATS) seeks to sustain demand for sanitation products and services through Supply Side Intervention. Supply-side activities include the development and promotion of low cost sanitation products. Samaritan’s Purse (SP), in its role as backstopping partner to other NGOs has developed several low-cost sanitation options therewith further operationalizing the PhATS.
Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

PhATS Technical Note: Demand Creation in Communities

Across Typhoon Yolanda-affected areas, the Philippines Department of Health (DoH) and Department of Education (DepEd), The League of Mayors and 46 LGUs are working in tandem with UNICEF and its 12 implementing NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) Partners to improve access to and use of sustainable sanitation through a strategy called the Philippines Approach To Total Sanitation (PhATS).

Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

PhATS Field Note: Incorporating Human Centered Design Into Sanitation Marketing

This PhATS (Philippines Approaches to Total Sanitation) Field Note shares the experience of incoporating Human Centred Design into the Sanitation Marketing component of the PhATS programme. The approach focuses on the users’ needs rather than the product/service alone and enables both the target market and the entrepreneurs to actively feed into the design process loop.
Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

Sustainability of ODF Practices in Kenya

Since the launch of the ODF campaign in 2011 UNICEF has supported the Ministry of Health to scale up sanitation activities with CLTS as its core strategy. The Department of  Environmental Health (DEHS) within the ministry has demonstrated strong leadership and is a clear champion for sanitation and hygiene. Sanitation services have been devolved to the county government under the new constitution (2010) and CLTS implementation is now being led by the County Health Teams.

Date: 2 August 2016
Country: 

Using Social Norms Theory to Strengthen CLTS in Southern Madagascar

This Field Note focuses on the southern region of Madagascar and documents how the region is transitioning from a 100% open defecation to a 100% ODF (Open Defecation Free) region. The southern region is one of the poorest regions in the country and characterized by restrictive, traditional beliefs as well as a rigid hierarchy of power and influence, which contribute towards the failure of development projects in this region.

Date: 2 August 2016
Country: 

Mobile Phone-Based Hygiene and Sanitation Promotion in Somalia

Somalia continues to experience one of the most complex humanitarian crises in the world and is one of the most restrictive and insecure environments for humanitarian actors. There is little evidence to show that approaches conventionally used in humanitarian settings, focused on the delivery of hygiene items and mass communication of messages, have resulted in consistent behaviour change.

Date: 2 August 2016
Country: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - UNICEF