UNICEF

Rethinking Rural Sanitation Approaches

A man shows his handwashing station in Nambale

Current rural sanitation practitioners and decision makers are faced with insufficient information on the relative performance of different programming approaches. These approaches are frequently defined either too tightly, or too loosely, which stifles innovation, learning and opportunities to combine and tailor approaches to the changing contexts in which they operate. The cost of facilitating and delivering these approaches is often not well understood or monitored.

Date: 21 February 2018

Exploring Determinants of Handwashing with Soap in Indonesia: A Quantitative Analysis

Handwashing with soap is recognized as a cost-effective intervention to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with enteric and respiratory infections. This study analyzes rural Indonesian households’ hygiene behaviors and attitudes to examine how motivations for handwashing, locations of handwashing space in the household, and handwashing moments are associated with handwashing with soap as potential determinants of the behavior. The analysis was conducted using results from a UNICEF cross-sectional study of 1700 households in six districts across three provinces of Indonesia.

Date: 3 January 2018
Country: 

Gender-Responsive Water, Sanitation and Hygiene: Key elements for effective WASH programming

Effective gender-responsive programming in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector can contribute to progress towards gender equality and important WASH results. This document outlines essential elements that WASH practitioners should take into account at all points in the programme cycle in order to enhance a gender-responsive approach to their work.

Date: 3 January 2018

Enabling Factors for Sustaining Open Defecation-Free Communities in Rural Indonesia: A Cross-Sectional Study

Community Approaches to Total Sanitation (CATS) programmes, like the Sanitasi Total Berbasis Masyarakat (STBM) programme of the Government of Indonesia, have played a significant role in reducing open defecation though still little is known about the sustainability of the outcomes. This study assessed the sustainability of verified Open Defecation Free (ODF) villages and explored the association between slippage occurrence and the strength of social norms through a government conducted cross-sectional data collection in rural Indonesia.

Date: 3 January 2018
Country: 

Soutenir les plus pauvres et vulnérables dans les programmes ATPC

La CLTS Knowledge Hub et l’UNICEF ont organisé un atelier centré sur l’Asie, intitulé « Soutenir les plus pauvres et les plus vulnérables dans les programmes ATPC » aux Philippines en mai 2017. L’événement a réuni des participants dotés d’une solide expérience de première main avec les programmes ATPC, en capacité de chercheurs ou d’appui aux quatre coins du continent.

Date: 29 November 2017

Register for the 6th Annual Virtual Conference on MHM in Schools

The 6th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Schools, co-hosted by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and UNICEF on the 17th October 2017, provides an opportunity to share the latest research and programming from around the world. The virtual conference is expected to bring together online over 1,000 participants.

For the first time ever, the virtual conference will be streaming live from the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina’s annual Water & Health Conference!

UNICEF Field Notes on Communiy Approaches to Total Sanitation: Learning from five country programmes

CATS is UNICEF’s core strategy to eliminate open defecation, in line with Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6.2: to ‘achieve access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and end open defecation, paying special attention to the needs of women and girls and those in vulnerable situations’.4 CATS has scaled up rapidly since its 2008 inception, with implementation in over 60 countries: approximately 48 million people now live in open defecation free communities that previously did not.5 With these achievements come even greater challenges.

Date: 27 July 2017
Country: 

Call for abstracts for the 6th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools

The 6th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Schools, co-hosted by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and UNICEF on the 17th October 2017, provides an opportunity to share the latest research and programming from around the world. The virtual conference is expected to bring together online over 1,000 participants from around the world. For the first time ever, the virtual conference will be streaming live from the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina’s annual Water & Health Conference!

WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme 2017 report

The WHO/UNICEF JMP has published its first report of the SDG period, Progress on drinking water, sanitation and hygiene: 2017 update and SDG baselines. The report introduces and defines the new indicators of safely managed drinking water and sanitation services. Estimates of safely managed drinking water services, the indicator for SDG target 6.1, are presented for 96 countries, while estimates are provided for safely managed sanitation services (target 6.2) for 84 countries.

Date: 13 July 2017

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - UNICEF