Plan

Rethinking Rural Sanitation Approaches

A man shows his handwashing station in Nambale

Current rural sanitation practitioners and decision makers are faced with insufficient information on the relative performance of different programming approaches. These approaches are frequently defined either too tightly, or too loosely, which stifles innovation, learning and opportunities to combine and tailor approaches to the changing contexts in which they operate. The cost of facilitating and delivering these approaches is often not well understood or monitored.

Date: 21 February 2018

Female Entrepreneurs- a catalyst for change

Plan International Pakistan, under the umbrella of DFID funded South Asia WASH Results Program, is supporting the Government of Punjab, in their initiative to achieve Open Defecation Free (ODF) Punjab, by 2018 1 along with providing entrepreneurial prospects to 29 women and 246 men to promote sanitation. The project has reached 894,524 beneficiaries in 9 districts with the message to improve their sanitation and hygiene practices.

Date: 27 September 2017
Country: 

Habib Hassan- A sanitation marketeer with a mission

Habib Hassan was an ordinary, 38 year old entrepreneur who owned a small hardware store in Chak no 148-A TDA U/C Thal Jhandi, Layyah. Now, he also runs a successful sanitation mart along with his hardware store, which provides latrine construction material for as low as PKR 3,250 (US$32.5) only, to the community members.

Read more about Habib in this case study from Plan International Pakistan.

Date: 27 September 2017
Country: 

The true costs of participatory sanitation: Evidence from community-led total sanitation studies in Ghana and Ethiopia

Evidence on sanitation and hygiene program costs is used for many purposes. The few studies that report costs use top-down costing methods that are inaccurate and inappropriate. Community-led total sanitation (CLTS) is a participatory behavior-change approach that presents difficulties for cost analysis. We used implementation tracking and bottom-up, activity-based costing to assess the process, program costs, and local investments for four CLTS interventions in Ghana and Ethiopia. Data collection included implementation checklists, surveys, and financial records review.

Date: 13 July 2017
Country: 

Supporting the poor to access sanitation in Bokeo Province, Laos

Internationally, there has been debate over the last decade about effective ways to increase access to sanitation as a basic human right and essential service to support public health. Within Laos, a similar debate is underway, with a history of provision of hardware subsidies through public or non-governmental organisation funding, and more recently a shift towards demand-driven approaches to motivate household investment and market support to enable more efficient, affordable supply of sanitation products.

Date: 4 April 2017
Country: 
Lao

CLTS in the Solomon Islands – the word is spreading…

The Solomon Islands has a reputation for being laid back and the smiling, barefooted airlines hostess that greets me at the grassy strip formerly known as Fera Airport, in Isabel Province, portrays this in typical fashion.  Coconut palms sway in the gentle breeze and as the 10 seater plane slides back down the muddy island runway, the hostess laughs guiltily from our transit boat, telling me that the plane came and went ahead of schedule, leaving passengers on the two boats heading our way stranded.  Nobody seems too phased.

Final evaluation of Plan's Pan Africa Programme

Between 2010 and 2016, Plan Netherlands implemented a CLTS programme in 8 countries in Africa: Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zambia, Ghana, Sierra Leone and Niger. This programme, although entitled ‘Empowering self-help sanitation of rural and peri-urban communities and schools in Africa’ soon became known as the Pan Africa Programme.

Date: 23 September 2016

ODF Sustainability Study in East Timor

In a bid to assess the extent to which CLTS programs have generated sustained sanitation and hygiene behaviour change in Timor Leste (TL), WaterAid, the AusAid Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Program (BESIK), United Nations Children's Emergency Fund United Nations (UNICEF), and Plan International conducted a joint study into three districts (Aileu, Ermera and Liquica), between December 2015 and April 2016.
Date: 22 September 2016

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