IDS

Notes for Convening, Facilitating and Following up on Rapid Action Learning and Sharing Workshops

These notes are based on experience convening, facilitating and following up on rural sanitation workshops in India in the past few years.  The most recent has been in Bhopal in August 2015. There it was in support of the Government’s policy in rural sanitation of Rapid Action Learning and Sharing.  The focus was on identifying and sharing innovations.

Date: 14 October 2015
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Getting to Swachh Bharat Gramin faster through rapid action learning and sharing: workshop report

This note summarizes outputs, conclusions and follows up actions from the Rapid Action Learning and Sharing Workshop on Innovations in Rural Sanitation organized by The Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation, Government of India in collaboration with the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and the CLTS Knowledge Hub at the Institute of Development Studies, and held in Bhopal, India from 18-19th August 2015.

Date: 1 September 2015
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Following the red thread: menstrual hygiene in Uganda

The CLTS Knowledge Hub has just published the latest issue in the Frontiers series- Breaking the next taboo: Menstrual Hygiene within CLTS.  This issue of Frontiers of CLTS illustrates how Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes can be expanded to address menstrual hygiene management (MHM) in schools and communities to alleviate these stresses on women and girls.

Report from the CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop at AfricaSan 4

On the 24th May 2015 The CLTS Knowledge Hub and the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) convened a ‘CLTS Learning and Sharing Workshop’ in Dakar, Senegal, ahead of the 4th AfricanSan Conference. The event was attended by over 90 WASH practitioners and consultants from NGOs, international agencies, government and research institutions based in 21 different countries. This report summarises the proceedings and discussions.

Date: 15 June 2015

Nutrition puzzles: the shit factor

A few years ago I posted a blog titled ‘Nutrition Puzzles’. Today, the puzzles seem a bit nearer to resolution. And the answer may be shit.

The earlier blog was prompted by the huge and massively expensive nutrition survey that was sponsored by a range of international aid donors. It showed to everyone’s surprise that, despite the crisis, nutrition indicators across Zimbabwe, including in rural areas, were not as disastrous as expected. Indeed, they were better than most neighbouring countries, including South Africa.

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