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Report from the regional workshop to share, learn and plan with quality and sustainability of Swachh Bharat Mission

Since the launch of the Swachh Bharat Mission - Gramin (SBM (G)), Uttar Pradesh (the most populous state in India) has seen pockets of success, with some Districts already declared or close to declaring themselves Open Defecation Free (ODF). To identify successful practices and methods for rapid sharing, learning, adopting and adapting of these for local needs and conditions, the Divisional Swachh Bharat Team, Moradabad, organised a three-day workshop from September 11-13, 2017.

Date: 28 September 2017
Country: 

An ongoing conversation: support versus subsidies for the most vulnerable

In the era of SDGs it is clear that there are no more easy wins and there is a need to move beyond the low hanging fruit. Sustainability studies show that slippage and poorly built or dirty latrines are most likely with the poor or most vulnerable in communities. There is clearly a need to make sure these groups are not slipping through the cracks. With many challenges around the issues of caste, gender, institutions, it is not enough to assume that intracommunity support is automatically given to those who need it the most.

Learning and reflections from the 40th WEDC conference

The theme of this year’s conference was “Local action with international cooperation to improve and sustain water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services”. Participants came from many different countries, organizations, governments and universities and many papers, poster presentations, espresso slots, side events and capacity building workshops took place. The one day CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop hosted by the CLTS Knowledge Hub was held before the main conference.

Photo competition: supporting the poorest and most marginalised

CLTS has proven to be a powerful approach to trigger communities into becoming open defecation free (ODF) in many countries across the world. However, sustainability studies are beginning to show that ODF status is often fragile and those most likely to revert back to open defecation are the poorest and most disadvantaged. This may be due to limited resources and capacity resulting in less well-built, less durable and less well-located toilets that are more likely to collapse, face problems and discourage use.

Discovering sanitation realities through rural immersions

At the end of last year the CLTS Knowledge Hub heard that the Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Indore, in collaboration with UNICEF and the Government of Madhya Pradesh, were sending 630 of their first year management students to spend a week living in 157 open defecation free (ODF) villages. The villages cut across 13 districts in the central Indian State of Madhya Pradesh. Students were asked to verify ODF status of villages through a household survey and early morning and evening inspections of open defecation sites.

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