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Comments: 0 Women and gender, Children and schools, Monitoring and sustainability
18 March 2015

Empowerment of primary school learners is an area that is needed to be considered seriously if total sanitation is to be realized. I was part of the team that visited Achilet Primary Schools in Uganda’s Tororo District alongside colleagues from Plan International’s Australia, Kenya, and Uganda Offices as well as colleagues from research institutions like Institute for Development Studies (IDS) – UK  and the International Water Center (IRC) Netherlands. The clean environment was witness to the activeness of both learners and teachers at the school.

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Comments: 2 behaviour change, verification, urban, Monitoring and sustainability, handwashing
13 March 2015

Today began with another superb sunrise over a glassy Lake Victoria.  Fisherman elegantly ushered fish into nets with a vigorous thwack of paddles on the surface, a sporadic rhythm for the chorus of unidentified birds welcoming the morning with song. 

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Comments: 0 verification, urban
13 March 2015

This was my first, but unfortunately, probably the last annual review meeting of the CLTS Pan Africa Programme. We started the day with introductions and ice-breakers followed by updates from the different countries that a part of the project. It was great to hear how the different country officers have been implementing CLTS as well as changes they have made following the Plan ODF Sustainability Study. From the different presentations two things really stood out:

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Comments: 0 urban
13 March 2015

Today was my first Pan-African CLTS review meeting and I enjoyed every part of it and also learnt a lot. It is my first time in Uganda after hearing so much of this beautiful country. Talking about firsts, this is my first blog ever. I am always enthused when I meet people who ask me to read their blogs and decided to volunteer myself alongside Sharon when one of the facilitators, Petra asked for volunteers to blog the day’s proceedings.

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Comments: 0 urban
13 March 2015

Uganda is the place to be this year and it's good to see a lot of familiar faces and also some new ones. This is the 6th time we come together and we have colleagues from 8 different Plan Country Offices, 4 different National Offices and colleagues from IDS and IRC.

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Comments: 0 Training and triggers, Adaptations and innovations
4 March 2015

The boma chief said it all.  One of the youngest boma chiefs in the Torit County, he stood up at the end of the CLTS triggering meeting and told his community:

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27 February 2015

The Pakistan Approach to Total Sanitation (PATS) endorses a number of different total sanitation models of which Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is one. Last week I attended the 2nd Pakistan Conference on Sanitation (PACOSAN II) in Islamabad. The conference was organised by the Ministry of Climate Change, with the support of WaterAid, UNICEF, Water and Sanitation Program – South Asia (WSP-SA), Plan Pakistan and other sector partners.

Comments: 0 Women and gender
28 January 2015

With around 70% of India’s 1.2 billion people living in rural areas and still suffering the burden of sub-optimal water provision as well the indignity of poor/no sanitation, the job of providing water, sanitation and hygiene for the household invariably falls on women. The UN Commission on Sustainable Development has very aptly affirmed that ‘water has a woman’s face’.

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Comments: 0 campaigns, Policy and advocacy for sanitation, Children and schools
22 January 2015

Indonesia has a massive problem of open defecation. The WHO/UNICEF JMP reports estimates that there are around 55 million people practicing open defecation in the country, or one quarter approximately of the population. This is the second highest country total, after India. Open defecation is mostly by the poorest populations and they bear the heaviest burden. Children – already vulnerable and marginalized - pay the highest price in respect of their survival and development. This well-established traditional behaviour is deeply ingrained through practice from early childhood.

Comments: 0 Women and gender, Health
23 December 2014

To make universal health coverage (UHC) truly universal we need an approach which places gender and power at the centre of our analysis. This means we need a discussion about who is included, how health is defined, what coverage entails and whether equity is ensured. To celebrate Universal Health Coverage Day RinGs has put together a list of ten arguments for why gender should be a central focus within UHC.

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