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Protocole pour l'evaluation et la certification de la fin de defecation a l'air libre (Mali)

Au Mali, la défécation à l’air libre est pratiquée par 19% de la population en milieu rural (JMP, Rapport 2013). De plus, seulement 14% de la population rurale ont accès à un assainissement amélioré et 53% de cette même population rurale ont accès à une source d’eau améliorée (JMP 2013). Avec ces couvertures et vu la croissance démographique, le Mali ne pourra pas atteindre les cibles des OMD en ce qui concerne le WASH.

Date: 18 August 2016
Country: 

First day at the Pan Africa annual review meeting: learning and reflections

This was my first, but unfortunately, probably the last annual review meeting of the CLTS Pan Africa Programme. We started the day with introductions and ice-breakers followed by updates from the different countries that a part of the project. It was great to hear how the different country officers have been implementing CLTS as well as changes they have made following the Plan ODF Sustainability Study. From the different presentations two things really stood out:

Setting the scene for open defecation free communities in Zambia and beyond

This week Plan International WASH Advisors, IDS, IRC, Plan Netherlands,Plan UK and Plan USA have converged in Lusaka to deliberate on shit. It has been interesting to see how different countries have progressed over the four years of implementing CLTS. The experiences from the participants reveal that gender is critical in CLTS because we need to engage women, men and children to make decisions on sanitation as well as address their specific needs.

CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop in Kathmandu, Nepal: sustainability, M&E and sanitation marketing

Group discussion at CLTS workshop, SACOSAN V

On the 20th October 2013, a one-day CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop was held in Kathmandu, Nepal, in the run-up to the 5th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN V). We were 45 participants, coming from different countries –with Nepal leading in terms of numbers of participants and India second– and with various degrees and kinds of experience in CLTS.

Pathways to Sustainability in Community-Led Total Sanitation. Experiences from Madhya Pradesh and Himachal Pradesh

Inspecting latrines
India’s rural Total Sanitation Campaign (1999-2012) in India was considered a complete failure due to its poor results and the millions of ‘missing latrines’. In the light of the shortcomings of the campaign, different actors tried to introduce the Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach in the country. However, as a result of opposition at the national level, only specific districts in certain states tried the approach. Many of these experiences were claimed to be very successful, but the evidence base of these claims was weak. Did they actually manage to introduce the CLTS in these areas? Did it yield good results? Are these sustainable?
Date: 29 August 2013
Country: 

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