Training and triggers

Learning Brief: Ensuring Child Safety During and After CLTS

Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) has been implemented in Cambodia since 2005 as a means of improving sanitation and hygiene practices in rural communities, and mobilising them to achieve open defecation free (ODF) status. In CLTS, children are often encouraged to be change agents to help influence their family and community to improve sanitation and hygiene behaviors. However, some strategies may pose a risk to child safety.

Date: 11 June 2018
Country: 

Gaining new insights into CLTS and rural WASH from field visits to Babati and Karatu districts, Tanzania

Sanitation practitioners attending the East and Southern African Regional CLTS and rural sanitation workshop visited the districts of Babati and Karatu, in the north east of Tanzania, in April 2018 to discuss the implementation of CLTS and WASH approaches under the Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for all (SSH4A) project run by SNV in partnership with the Government of Tanzania (GoT) and the UK's Department for International Develo

Nigeria: Effectiveness and Sustainability of Community-Led Total Sanitation

In Nigeria, diarrheal diseases are the third leading cause of mortality, accounting for over 75,000 deaths of children aged 1-59 months in 2015 (WHO, 2016).  From 2012 to 2016, Action Against Hunger worked with local authorities to trigger 138 communities in Yobe State, Northern Nigeria, using the Community-Led Total Sanitation methodology. The objective of this approach is to empower the community to realise the negative impacts of open defecation on health and well-being, and thus mobilise itself to eliminate open defecation and improve sanitation with limited external intervention.

Date: 1 March 2018
Country: 

In Mali, Communities Take Health and Well-Being into their Own Hands

In the center of Simaye village in Mali’s Mopti Region, men, women, and children gather under a large tree to listen. Two USAID-trained facilitators discuss the health challenges facing the village. Only three latrines serve many families, so more than half of the people are practicing open defecation; the water point no longer functions, so most families are pulling dirty water from the river; many of the infants and young children are not benefitting from exclusive breastfeeding or a diversified diet, so they are malnourished.

All for one and one for All? Supporting the poorest through the CLTS process

Reflections from the CLTS Side Event at the 40th WEDC Conference

Achieving SDG target 6.2 necessitates a reworking of the national landscape of sanitation policies, strategies and programmes. Intra-community support for ending open defecation can no longer be taken fore granted by global and national CLTS actors. Last week at the 40th WEDC Conference the CLTS Knowledge Hub and UNICEF held a side event on ‘Revisiting Subsidies: supporting the poorest through the CLTS process’.

Raising the CLTS bar: a case study from Bankura, West Bengal

Having learnt a lot from Malda and Cooch Behar about scaling up the CLTS approach, the Centre for Sustainable Solutions in Social Welfare started a pilot in the district of Bankura in West Bengal. There was a theory in the state, much promoted by an agency implementing the national sanitation programme in the adjoining district of Purulia, that while the CLTS approach worked in the districts of Malda and Cooch Behar, it would not work in the twin districts of Bankura and Purulia.

Date: 28 April 2017
Country: 

Lessons Learned: Hybrid CLTS Approach to Improving Sanitation

USAID’s Ghana Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (GWASH) Project aimed to improve rural sanitation access through the provision of household latrines to households in targeted communities. In the beginning of the project, GWASH used a “high-subsidy” approach for household latrine provision, providing households with a 60 percent subsidy per latrine. It was in this vein that GWASH aimed to meet its project target of constructing 4,680 household latrines over the course of a four-year period.

Date: 6 April 2017
Country: 

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