shared sanitation

Sustainability and WASH: reflections from the UNC Water and Health Conference 2018

The University of North Carolina (UNC), Water and Health Conference 2018 in Chapel Hill, United States, provided researchers, implementers and donors the opportunity to reflect and discuss how the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector is achieving sustainability, the biggest challenges to progress and possible ways forward to make sanitation outcomes equitable, accessible and affordable to everyone at all times. (The UNC Water and Health Conference is held at Chapel Hill since 2011)

Achieving sustainability in WASH research and programming

Female-friendly public and community toilets: a guide for planners and decision makers

The 'Female-friendly guide', published in October 2018 and written by WaterAid, UNICEF and WSUP, is designed primarily for use by local authorities in towns and cities who are in charge of public and community toilets. It's also useful for national governments, public and private service providers, NGOs, donors and civil society organisations who play a role in delivering these services.

Date: 9 November 2018

Urban sanitation coverage and environmental fecal contamination: Links between the household and public environments of Accra, Ghana

Exposure to faecal contamination in public areas, especially in dense, urban environments, may significantly contribute to gastrointestinal infection risk. This study examined associations between sanitation and faecal contamination in public environments in four low-income neighbourhoods in Accra, Ghana. Soil and open drain samples were tested for E. coli, adenovirus, and norovirus. Sanitation facilities in surveyed households were categorised by onsite faecal sludge containment (“contained” vs. “uncontained”) using previous Joint Monitoring Program infrastructure guidelines.

Date: 26 July 2018
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High-quality shared toilets can reduce women’s feelings of stress due to fear of violence

This two-page policy brief summarises the findings of a qualitative research study which looked at causes and levels of psychosocial stress among users of traditional shared latrines and high-quality shared toilets in informal settlements in Mozambique’s capital city, Maputo. In many slum communities in Africa and Asia, many people live in rental compounds in small rooms that do not have space for private toilets. Such people necessarily rely on shared sanitation facilities.

Date: 26 July 2018
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Limited services? The role of shared sanitation in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Target 6.2 of the Sustainable Development Goals calls for universal access to sanitation by 2030. The associated indicator is the population using ‘safely managed’ sanitation services. Shared sanitation is classified as a ‘limited’ sanitation service and some donors and governments are reluctant to invest in it, as it will not count towards achieving target 6.2. This could result in poor citizens in dense slums being left out of any sanitation improvements, while efforts are diverted towards better-off areas where achieving ‘safely managed’ sanitation is easier.

Date: 13 July 2017

Public toilets: a viable interim solution? Reflections from the 39th WEDC conference

The WHO/UNICEF joint monitoring programme defines improved sanitation as access to individual household toilets. This ultimate goal advocates for every family to access and maintain their own latrine - providing the dignity, safety and convenience of not having to share. However, in many urban areas issues of land ownership, space and a lack of infrastructure make this an impossible aim. Although CLTS has been very successful in creating the demand for sanitation, we must look further to viable and sustainable solutions in urban settings which can respond to these challenges.

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