SDGs

The recipe for success: how policy-makers can integrate water, sanitation and hygiene into actions to end malnutrition

At current rates of progress, the world will not meet the Sustainable Development Goals to end malnutrition by 2030. In this report, Action Against Hunger, WaterAid and SHARE assert that the integration of action on nutrition and WASH is fundamental to the recipe for success.

You can also read this related blog on the WaterAid website and watch a short video

Date: 28 September 2017

An ongoing conversation: support versus subsidies for the most vulnerable

In the era of SDGs it is clear that there are no more easy wins and there is a need to move beyond the low hanging fruit. Sustainability studies show that slippage and poorly built or dirty latrines are most likely with the poor or most vulnerable in communities. There is clearly a need to make sure these groups are not slipping through the cracks. With many challenges around the issues of caste, gender, institutions, it is not enough to assume that intracommunity support is automatically given to those who need it the most.

All for one and one for All? Supporting the poorest through the CLTS process

Reflections from the CLTS Side Event at the 40th WEDC Conference

Achieving SDG target 6.2 necessitates a reworking of the national landscape of sanitation policies, strategies and programmes. Intra-community support for ending open defecation can no longer be taken fore granted by global and national CLTS actors. Last week at the 40th WEDC Conference the CLTS Knowledge Hub and UNICEF held a side event on ‘Revisiting Subsidies: supporting the poorest through the CLTS process’.

Limited services? The role of shared sanitation in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

Target 6.2 of the Sustainable Development Goals calls for universal access to sanitation by 2030. The associated indicator is the population using ‘safely managed’ sanitation services. Shared sanitation is classified as a ‘limited’ sanitation service and some donors and governments are reluctant to invest in it, as it will not count towards achieving target 6.2. This could result in poor citizens in dense slums being left out of any sanitation improvements, while efforts are diverted towards better-off areas where achieving ‘safely managed’ sanitation is easier.

Date: 13 July 2017

Sanitation for all: Scaling up is hard to do

On World Water Day 2016, Jan Willem Rosenboom reflects on the challenges and opportunities for meeting the SDGs for sanitation:

"The Sustainable Development Goals give us a second chance to get it right, but they seriously up the ante. Instead of “merely” providing half of the unserved population with access to improved sanitation, as the MDGs required, the SDGs tell us we can only declare success once every person, every school and every health facility has — and uses — safely managed sanitation facilities.

How do we go beyond 'business as usual'? More reflections from the UNC Conference

Today I continued to follow the conversation about new directions in the over-all system of international WASH development. There is a lot of talk about changing the way aid business is conducted. But it’s hard to say how all this lofty talk will translate into actually useful change. I sensed some frustration on the part of developing country governmental reps and residents. No one’s talking about power dynamics. I also listened to some interesting sanitation reports.

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