Scaling Up

How do we go beyond 'business as usual'? More reflections from the UNC Conference

Today I continued to follow the conversation about new directions in the over-all system of international WASH development. There is a lot of talk about changing the way aid business is conducted. But it’s hard to say how all this lofty talk will translate into actually useful change. I sensed some frustration on the part of developing country governmental reps and residents. No one’s talking about power dynamics. I also listened to some interesting sanitation reports.

Getting to Swachh Bharat Gramin faster through rapid action learning and sharing: workshop report

This note summarizes outputs, conclusions and follows up actions from the Rapid Action Learning and Sharing Workshop on Innovations in Rural Sanitation organized by The Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation, Government of India in collaboration with the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and the CLTS Knowledge Hub at the Institute of Development Studies, and held in Bhopal, India from 18-19th August 2015.

Date: 1 September 2015
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Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability Learning Series: Cambodia Learning Brief

Plan International supports CLTS implementation in a number of communities around Cambodia. This learning brief by the Water Institute at UNC presents the roles of local actors in Plan International’s CLTS program activities In Cambodia and highlight considerations for scalability, planning, implementation, and evaluation. Plan International and other sanitation practitioners can support the national government and local actors in developing a systematic approach to community selection, strengthening CLTS facilitation training, and standardizing monitoring & evaluation processes.

Date: 7 August 2015
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CLTS in Ghana: Findings from a Situational Assessment

A situational assessment can inform program planning and evaluation. The Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability project team ((Plan USA and UNC) assessed national policy, institutional arrangements, and monitoring systems for CLTS in Ghana prior to evaluating how natural leader training influences CLTS outcomes. It was found that the national government shows strong support for CLTS, non-government actors play key roles in implementation, and improved monitoring is needed to assess program efficiency and effectiveness.

Date: 30 April 2015
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CLTS in Ethiopia: Findings from a Situational Assessment

A situational assessment can inform program planning and evaluation. The Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability project team (Plan USA and UNC) assessed national policy, institutional arrangements, and monitoring systems for CLTS in Ethiopia prior to evaluations of Plan International CLTS projects with health extension workers.

Date: 30 April 2015
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CLTS Research Brief: Implementation Context in Kenya, Ghana, and Ethiopia

The influence of local actors on sanitation outcomes may be linked to contextual factors. In 2012, prior to working with local actors in Kenya, Ghana, and Ethiopia, the Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability project team characterized the CLTS implementation context in each country. This piece synthesizes these findings, which align with those of the UN-Water GLAAS 2014 report and observations of CLTS practice from the grey literature.

Date: 30 April 2015
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Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability CLTS Learning Series: Cambodia Country Report

This report presents findings on Plan International’s Community‐led Total Sanitation (CLTS) approach in Cambodia. The study was conducted by The Water Institute at UNC as part of the Plan International USA project: “Testing CLTS Approaches for Scalability” (TCAS), which evaluates the roles of the following local actors in CLTS: local government, teachers, and natural leaders.
Date: 12 February 2015
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