Policy and advocacy for sanitation

The Costs of Meeting the 2030 Sustainable Development Goal Targets on Drinking Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

A dedicated goal for water has recently been endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly as part of the sustainable development goal (SDG) framework. This study provides an assessment of the global costs of meeting the WASH-related targets of Goal #6. The targets assessed include achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all (target 6.1), achieving access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all, and ending open defecation (target 6.2).

Date: 16 February 2016

Multisectoral Approaches to Improving Nutrition: Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Emerging evidence in the WASH sector suggests the linkages between WASH and nutrition may be stronger than previously understood. This has generated a great deal of momentum in both the WASH and nutrition sectors about how the two can work more closely to achieve better outcomes. This paper addresses this objective from both the WASH perspective, on how nutrition-specific programs (as well as nutrition-sensitive social protection, livelihoods, and community-driven development programs) can provide an alternative platform to deliver services at scale and more cost-effectively; and the nutrition perspective, on how WASH interventions can be adapted to include nutritional considerations, making them more nutrition-sensitive, and more impactful on nutrition.
Date: 11 February 2016

Bum deal: is access to a toilet a human right or a privilege?

Adequate sanitation is a human right, recognised by the UN. But for the 2.4 billion people with nowhere to go safely, how does that right become a reality? Kenya and Uganda have different approaches yet, despite political commitment in both countries, they are some way off the goal of ensuring sanitation for all.

Why we should not set 'targets' for ODF

The Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM) is a revamped programme on sanitation launched by the H’ble Prime Minister, with a clear focus on outcomes. The programme was drafted carefully, looking at learnings from past sanitation programmes in the rural sector. Despite many programmes, the rural sanitation coverage rate did not get much success, for varied reasons. The primary reason was inability to implement programme in a pure ‘demand driven’ way, and lack of capacities to trigger behavioural change, required for this demand generation.

The Dhaka Declaration

From the 11th to 13th January 2016, the 6th SACOSAN COnference took place in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Under the banner ‘Better Sanitation, Better Life’ the three-day conference focused on how to accelerate progress on sanitation and hygiene promotion in South Asia, and thus enhance the quality of people’s lives. It resulted in the Dhaka Declaration, signed by representatives of the 8 member states, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Date: 19 January 2016

The Dhaka Declaration

An important change agreed upon is the creation of a SACOSAN Secretariat and a Working Group, to facilitate communication and horizontal learning between the biennial conferences. The Sri Lankan government has volunteered to host the Secretariat.

Another point in the declaration is to reach out to other multi-country fora with information and advocacy for sanitation improvement. SAARC, the regional coalition,  was specifically mentioned; and a SAARC representative spoke in the concluding ceremony.

Toilets and Health: Better Sanitation for Better Nutrition (World Toilet Day Panel)

The Permanent Mission of Singapore and UN-Water are pleased to invite you to the 2015 World Toilet Day observance at the United Nations on Thursday 19th November 13:15-14:45. The event will take the form of a lunch time panel discussion on Toilets and Health: better sanitation for better nutrition. See this flyer for more information, the programme outline and how to register.

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