nutrition

Linking WASH and nutrition strategies for more sustainable outcomes

The linkages between water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and undernutrition are increasingly recognized by the development community. The vicious cycle between undernutrition and WASH related diseases (such as diarrhea and environmental enteropathy) is more apparent than ever before: children who receive adequate nutritional intake, yet suffer from diseases due to a lack of WASH, aren’t able to fully absorb or take advantage of those calories or nutrients. The cycle continues as those undernourished children are more vulnerable to WASH-related infections. -

Date: 14 July 2014

Poor sanitation in India may affecr well-fed children with malnutrition

In India, a long economic boom has done little to reduce the vast number of cases of malnutrition and stunting in children, leaving them with mental and physical deficits that affect them for the rest of their lives. An emerging body of scientific studies suggest that many of the 162 million children under the age of 5 in the world who are malnourished are suffering less a lack of food than poor sanitation.

Hygiene, Sanitation, and Water: Forgotten Foundations of Health

Every year, around 2.4 million deaths worldwide (4.2% of all deaths) could be prevented if everyone practised appropriate hygiene and had good, reliable sanitation and drinking water. The majority of these deaths are children in developing countries dying from diarrhoea and subsequent malnutrition, and from other diseases attributable to malnutrition.
How is an opportunity to prevent so many deaths (and 6.6% of the global burden of disease in terms of disability-adjusted life years or DALYs failing to attract the attention of the international public health community?

Date: 12 June 2014

The effect of interventions to improve water quality and supply, provide sanitation and promote handwashing with soap on physical growth in children

The Cochrane Review on WASH and Childhood Undernutrition was launched in November 2013. This study was funded by DFID through the SHARE Research Consortium and provides a definitive synthesis of the current evidence relating improvements in drinking water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) to childhood undernutrition.

Date: 15 May 2014

Reflections on the IWC WASH Conference in Brisbane

I have been puzzling to understand why I found this conference so energising and such a good experience.  In part it was the choreography and facilitation by Barbara Evans and others – what a difference it makes to have inventive ways of involving everyone and keeping us awake with bits of serious fun, and what a difference when facilitators and presenters are on top of their topics, have new things to share, are driven by controlled passion, and really enjoy themselves.  And maybe there is something Ozzie about this – welcome, openness, informality, climate.

Challenges of behaviour change in rural north India

Despite large government and NGO programs, despite substantially increased public spending on sanitation, and despite sustained economic growth, open defecation is declining very, very slowly in rural “Hindi heartland” north India. Widespread resistance to using simple latrines in the rural north Indian plains states is a human development crisis and a serious puzzle: this is exactly the place on earth where open defecation is most common and where high population density most raises the human and economic costs of open defecation.

Date: 28 March 2014
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Are children in West Bengal shorter than children in Bangladesh?

Children in West Bengal and Bangladesh are presumed to share the same distribution of genetic height potential. In West Bengal they are richer, on average, and are therefore slightly taller. However, when wealth is held constant, children in Bangladesh are taller. This gap can be fully accounted for by differences in open defecation, and especially by open defecation in combination with differences in women’s status and maternal nutrition.

Date: 19 February 2014
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Growing Tall and Smart with Toilets: Stopping Open Defecation Improves Children’s Height in Cambodia

A new research brief from the Water and Sanitation Program (WSP), Investing in the Next Generation: Growing Tall and Smart with Toilets, examines how the level of open defecation in a community is associated with shorter children in Cambodia. Key findings highlighted in the research brief are that open defecation is associated with greater stunting at every age, and that it is associated with greater stunting even when the household itself does not openly defecate.

Date: 19 December 2013
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Improved Use of Toilets Boosts Childhood Test Scores, Decreases Stunting

Access to improved sanitation can increase cognition in children, according to a new World Bank study. The study contributes to a growing body of research linking stunting and open defecation. Currently, more than 2.5 billion people worldwide lack access to toilets, and one billion people practice open defecation. 

Date: 19 November 2013
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