nutrition

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

Have We Substantially Underestimated the Impact of Improved Sanitation Coverage on Child Health?

This PLO article posits that although widely accepted as being one of the most important public health advances of the past hundred years, the contribution that improving sanitation coverage can make to child health is still unclear, especially since the publication of two large studies of sanitation in India which found no effect on child morbidity. The authors hypothesise that the value of sanitation does not come directly from use of improved sanitation but from improving community coverage.

Date: 6 December 2016

The missing ingredients: are policy-makers doing enough on water, sanitation and hygiene to end malnutrition?

Governments around the world have committed to end malnutrition by 2030. However, international and national nutrition plans and actions will fail if they don’t include all the ingredients for success. Evidence shows that scaling up nutrition-specific interventions to 90% coverage in 34 of the countries with the highest burden of child undernutrition, will only reduce stunting by 20%.

Date: 13 October 2016

Can water, sanitation and hygiene help eliminate stunting? Current evidence and policy implications

Stunting is a complex and enduring challenge with far-reaching consequences for those affected and society as a whole. To accelerate progress in eliminating stunting, broader efforts are needed that reach beyond the nutrition sector to tackle the underlying determinants of undernutrition. There is growing interest in how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions might support strategies to reduce stunting in high-burden settings, such as SouthAsia and sub-SaharanAfrica.

Date: 12 August 2016

Multisectoral Approaches to Improving Nutrition: Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene

Emerging evidence in the WASH sector suggests the linkages between WASH and nutrition may be stronger than previously understood. This has generated a great deal of momentum in both the WASH and nutrition sectors about how the two can work more closely to achieve better outcomes. This paper addresses this objective from both the WASH perspective, on how nutrition-specific programs (as well as nutrition-sensitive social protection, livelihoods, and community-driven development programs) can provide an alternative platform to deliver services at scale and more cost-effectively; and the nutrition perspective, on how WASH interventions can be adapted to include nutritional considerations, making them more nutrition-sensitive, and more impactful on nutrition.
Date: 11 February 2016

Innovative Bangladesh: CLTS Sharing and Learning at the 6th SACOSAN Conference in Dhaka

Regional CLTS sharing and learning workshop, Sunday 10 January 2016: Innovative Bangladesh!
The traditional pre-SAN gathering of CLTS practitioners and enthusiasts brought together an interesting and eclectic group in Dhaka, with a notably large and welcome presence by the Afghanistan delegation. The focus of the first session was on innovation and new learning. While always difficult to focus the group’s attention tightly on new learning, several interesting new developments were highlighted.

The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) Trial

Child stunting and anemia are intractable public health problems in developing countries and have profound short- and long-term consequences. The Sanitation Hygiene Infant Nutrition Efficacy (SHINE) trial is motivated by the premise that environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a major underlying cause of both stunting and anemia, that chronic inflammation is the central characteristic of EED mediating these adverse effects, and that EED is primarily caused by high fecal ingestion due to living in conditions of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH).

Date: 8 December 2015
Country: 

Toilets and Health: Better Sanitation for Better Nutrition (World Toilet Day Panel)

The Permanent Mission of Singapore and UN-Water are pleased to invite you to the 2015 World Toilet Day observance at the United Nations on Thursday 19th November 13:15-14:45. The event will take the form of a lunch time panel discussion on Toilets and Health: better sanitation for better nutrition. See this flyer for more information, the programme outline and how to register.

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