nutrition

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

The impact of sanitation on infectious disease and nutritional status: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Sanitation aims to sequester human feces and prevent exposure to fecal pathogens. More than 2.4 billion people worldwide lack access to improved sanitation facilities and almost one billion practice open defecation. This study by Freeman et al undertook systematic reviews and meta-analyses to compile the most recent evidence on the impact of sanitation on diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, trachoma, schistosomiasis, and nutritional status assessed using anthropometry.

Date: 22 June 2017

An individual-level meta-analysis assessing the impact of community-level sanitation access on child stunting, anemia, and diarrhea

A lack of access to sanitation is an important risk factor child health, facilitating fecal-oral transmission of pathogens including soil-transmitted helminthes and various causes of diarrheal disease. This study by David A. Larsen, Thomas Grisham, Erik Slawsky and Lutchmie Narine conducted a meta-analysis of cross-sectional surveys to determine the impact that community-level sanitation access has on child health for children with and without household sanitation access.

Date: 22 June 2017

Stories of Change: Reflections from SHARE Phase 1

These Stories of Change (SoC) seek to capture and better understand impacts from Phase I of the SHARE consortium, and also include some related work conducted in Phase II. In Phase I, SHARE worked with five main partners: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)/ Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI), and WaterAid.

Date: 8 February 2017

"Chickens don’t use toilets": Why global WASH efforts should start focusing on animal feces

Those who have tried toilet training a pet dog or cat know that it can be a difficult proposition. How about toilet training a flock of 30 chickens?
You’re now asking “Um… why would I want to?” Because in poor countries chickens are everywhere, chickens are pooping wherever they want, and chicken poop is dangerous for young children.

Disease externalities and net nutrition: Evidence from changes in sanitation and child height in Cambodia, 2005–2010

Child height is an important indicator of human capital and human development, in large part because early life health and net nutrition shape both child height and adult economic productivity and health. Between 2005 and 2010, the average height of children under 5 in Cambodia significantly increased. What contributed to this improvement? Recent evidence suggests that exposure to poor sanitation - and specifically to widespread open defecation - can pose a critical threat to child growth. We closely analyze the sanitation height gradient in Cambodia in these two years.

Date: 13 December 2016
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The missing ingredients: are policy-makers doing enough on water, sanitation and hygiene to end malnutrition?

Governments around the world have committed to end malnutrition by 2030. However, international and national nutrition plans and actions will fail if they don’t include all the ingredients for success. Evidence shows that scaling up nutrition-specific interventions to 90% coverage in 34 of the countries with the highest burden of child undernutrition, will only reduce stunting by 20%.

Date: 13 October 2016

Can water, sanitation and hygiene help eliminate stunting? Current evidence and policy implications

Stunting is a complex and enduring challenge with far-reaching consequences for those affected and society as a whole. To accelerate progress in eliminating stunting, broader efforts are needed that reach beyond the nutrition sector to tackle the underlying determinants of undernutrition. There is growing interest in how water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions might support strategies to reduce stunting in high-burden settings, such as SouthAsia and sub-SaharanAfrica.

Date: 12 August 2016

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