nutrition

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

The recipe for success: how policy-makers can integrate water, sanitation and hygiene into actions to end malnutrition

At current rates of progress, the world will not meet the Sustainable Development Goals to end malnutrition by 2030. In this report, Action Against Hunger, WaterAid and SHARE assert that the integration of action on nutrition and WASH is fundamental to the recipe for success.

You can also read this related blog on the WaterAid website and watch a short video

Date: 28 September 2017

The effect of young children's faeces disposal practices on child growth: Evidence from 34 countries

The study by Valerie Bauza and Jeremy S. Guest looked at the relationship between child faeces disposal and child growth in low- and middle-income countries. You can read a more detailed abstract here. It was published in the Journal of Tropical Medicine and International Health is available for purchase from the Wiley Online Library

Date: 21 July 2017

The impact of sanitation on infectious disease and nutritional status: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Sanitation aims to sequester human feces and prevent exposure to fecal pathogens. More than 2.4 billion people worldwide lack access to improved sanitation facilities and almost one billion practice open defecation. This study by Freeman et al undertook systematic reviews and meta-analyses to compile the most recent evidence on the impact of sanitation on diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, trachoma, schistosomiasis, and nutritional status assessed using anthropometry.

Date: 22 June 2017

An individual-level meta-analysis assessing the impact of community-level sanitation access on child stunting, anemia, and diarrhea

A lack of access to sanitation is an important risk factor child health, facilitating fecal-oral transmission of pathogens including soil-transmitted helminthes and various causes of diarrheal disease. This study by David A. Larsen, Thomas Grisham, Erik Slawsky and Lutchmie Narine conducted a meta-analysis of cross-sectional surveys to determine the impact that community-level sanitation access has on child health for children with and without household sanitation access.

Date: 22 June 2017

Stories of Change: Reflections from SHARE Phase 1

These Stories of Change (SoC) seek to capture and better understand impacts from Phase I of the SHARE consortium, and also include some related work conducted in Phase II. In Phase I, SHARE worked with five main partners: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B), International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED)/ Shack/Slum Dwellers International (SDI), and WaterAid.

Date: 8 February 2017

"Chickens don’t use toilets": Why global WASH efforts should start focusing on animal feces

Those who have tried toilet training a pet dog or cat know that it can be a difficult proposition. How about toilet training a flock of 30 chickens?
You’re now asking “Um… why would I want to?” Because in poor countries chickens are everywhere, chickens are pooping wherever they want, and chicken poop is dangerous for young children.

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