Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

Linking CLTS with Multiple Use Water Services (MUS), VSLA and Nutrition: Plan Ethiopia’s experience

Plan Ethiopia’s project “Water, the key to a better future”- WASH-FNS is an integrated project on water, sanitation and food security which has been implemented since October 2013. The objective is to reduce morbidity, mortality and malnutrition of children, caused by waterborne diseases and malnutrition in two districts (Bahir Dar Zuria & Dara) in Ethiopia.
Date: 15 July 2015

Effectiveness of a rural sanitation programme on diarrhoea, soil-transmitted helminth infection, and child malnutrition in Odisha, India: a cluster-randomised trial

This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a rural sanitation intervention, within the context of the Government of India’s Total Sanitation Campaign, to prevent diarrhoea, soil-transmitted helminth infection, and child malnutrition. It is based on a cluster-randomised controlled trial between May 20, 2010, and December 22, 2013, in 100 rural villages in Odisha, India.
Date: 14 October 2014

Environmental Enteric Dysfunction – an Overview

This technical brief by the CMAM (Collaborating to improve the management of acute malnutrition worldwide) Forum provides an up-to-date and accessible overview of this condition, including impact on health and nutrition, diagnosis, epidemiology,possible aetiology and approaches to treatment.  It considers how our present knowledge of this condition should affect our practice today, and highlights current research, future priorities and further reading.  It is aimed at stakeholders involved and interested in the reduction of childhood undernutrition, especially those addressing child health

Date: 2 October 2014

What do toilets have to do with nutrition? More than you might think

Approximately 160 million children under the age of 5 are stunted. This means they are failing to grow well and lack of height can be a marker of a whole range of developmental setbacks including cognitive impairment. The 2013 Lancet series on maternal and child nutrition confirmed that to reduce stunting we need three things: an enabling environment for political commitment; a scaled-up series of cost-effective nutrition interventions and robust underlying drivers (food security, empowered women and a supportive health environment).

Linking WASH and nutrition strategies for more sustainable outcomes

The linkages between water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and undernutrition are increasingly recognized by the development community. The vicious cycle between undernutrition and WASH related diseases (such as diarrhea and environmental enteropathy) is more apparent than ever before: children who receive adequate nutritional intake, yet suffer from diseases due to a lack of WASH, aren’t able to fully absorb or take advantage of those calories or nutrients. The cycle continues as those undernourished children are more vulnerable to WASH-related infections. -

Date: 14 July 2014

Poor sanitation in India may affecr well-fed children with malnutrition

In India, a long economic boom has done little to reduce the vast number of cases of malnutrition and stunting in children, leaving them with mental and physical deficits that affect them for the rest of their lives. An emerging body of scientific studies suggest that many of the 162 million children under the age of 5 in the world who are malnourished are suffering less a lack of food than poor sanitation.


Subscribe to RSS - nutrition