Monitoring and sustainability

Key resource: Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? Analysis from the AfricaSan Conference, Kigali, Rwanda

Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? (IWA Publishing 2013, eds Piers Cross and Yolande Coombes) takes stock of progress made by African countries through the AfricaSan process since 2008 and the progress needed to meet the MDG on sanitation by 2015 and beyond. This book addresses priorities which have been identified by African countries as the key elements which need to be addressed in order to accelerate progress.

Date: 21 October 2013

Thinking Beyond the Finish Line: Sustainable Sanitation Services for All

From the 14th to 17th March 2017. A regional face-to-face learning event ‘Thinking beyond the Finish Line: Sustainable Sanitation Services for All’ was held in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, as part of SNV’s Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene for All (SSH4A) Programme.  The specific objectives of the event were to

 

Date: 11 January 2017

Progress on CLTSH: Findings from a national review of rural sanitation in Ethiopia

A 2015-16 survey of CLTSH across 8 Regions of Ethiopia has found that open defecation continues to reduce across the country, now estimated at 32%. Much of this coverage remains ‘unimproved’ or basic, and the next big challenge, whilst continuing to accelerate progress, is converting this coverage to ‘improved’ or safely managed sanitation.
Whilst the implementation of CLTSH remains strong, the study findings summarised in this UNICEF WASH Learning Note suggest there are some key implementation adjustments which could improve the uptake of improved sanitation.

Date: 5 January 2017
Country: 

Analysis of behavioral change techniques in CLTS programs

The lack of sanitation facilitates the spread of diarrheal diseases - a leading cause of child deaths worldwide. As of 2012, an estimated 1 billion people still practiced open defecation (OD). To address this issue, one behavioral change approach used is community-led total sanitation (CLTS). It is now applied in an estimated 66 countries worldwide, and many countries have adopted this approach as their main strategy for scaling up rural sanitation coverage.

Date: 13 December 2016

Challenges and opportunities for inclusive and sustainable WASH

Great strides have been made in improving sanitation in many developing countries, not least through CLTS, an innovative method developed to address the behaviours behind ongoing open defecation. CLTS has spread rapidly over the last 16 years and is now present in over 60 different countries. However recent research shows that more thinking and action is needed to ensure that sanitation efforts are sustainable and inclusive.

Monitoring and evaluation – moving beyond the data graveyard

Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) has long been considered a necessary companion to WASH interventions but the relationship between ‘doing’ and ‘observing’ continues to be a tricky one. Over three sessions during the UNC Water and Health conference last week, Professor Barbara Evans and Dr Jamie Bartram took participants through a highly interactive investigation of where M&E are currently at in the WASH world, which fuelled conversations both in and outside the sessions.

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