Monitoring and sustainability

Key resource: Fronteiras do CLTS edição 4: Sustentabilidade e CLTS- Ponto da Situação

Houve vários estudos úteis sobre sustentabilidade que destacaram alguns dos diferentes aspectos, bem como as complexidades em questão. Não é claro, porém, quanto do que aprendemos com esses estudos foi incorporado na programação e na prática actual e futura. Com base em pesquisa existente e no nosso próprio entendimento, este número de Fronteiras do CLTS é uma tentativa de fazer uma síntese actualizada de onde nos encontramos no início de 2015.

Date: 15 June 2015

Key resource: Frontiers of CLTS Issue 4: Sustainability and CLTS- Taking Stock

Sustainability is without doubt one of the most burning subject matters that subsumes many of the issues that we are seeing in CLTS and wider WASH practice. There have been several useful studies on sustainability that have highlighted some of the different aspects as well as the complexities involved. However, it is unclear how much of the learning from these studies has been built into current and future programming and practice. Based on existing research and our own understanding, this issue of Frontiers of CLTS is an attempt at an up to date synthesis of where we are at the beginning of 2015. In the issue, we identify some priority areas for learning.
Date: 25 February 2015

Key resource: Frontiers of CLTS Issue 1: Participatory Design Development for Sanitation

Frontiers of CLTS Issue 1 cover

Sustainability of latrines is a key issue in CLTS. Sandy or rocky soils, seasonal flooding and termites can present challenges to communities who have taken sanitation into their own hands as a result of CLTS and are building latrines. The CLTS Handbook identifies the need for participatory design approaches during follow-up sessions with triggered communities. Sanitation marketing programmes have also applied participatory design through engaging users and sanitation suppliers to create innovative sanitation technologies.

Date: 18 November 2013
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Key resource: Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? Analysis from the AfricaSan Conference, Kigali, Rwanda

Sanitation and Hygiene in Africa: Where do We Stand? (IWA Publishing 2013, eds Piers Cross and Yolande Coombes) takes stock of progress made by African countries through the AfricaSan process since 2008 and the progress needed to meet the MDG on sanitation by 2015 and beyond. This book addresses priorities which have been identified by African countries as the key elements which need to be addressed in order to accelerate progress.

Date: 21 October 2013

Key resource: Lukenya Notes: Taking CLTS to Scale with Quality

The Lukenya Notes are a collection of experiences and key recommendations from the IDS meeting of CLTS practitioners held in Lukenya, Nairobi in July 2011, immediately after the AfricaSan3 meeting. The aim of the workshop was to focus on the key challenges we all face in taking CLTS to scale. Insights, case studies and options are clustered by themes which emerged from workshop brainstorming.

Date: 19 September 2011

Micro-Planning for CLTS: Experience from Kenya

Micro-planning is a tool often used in the context of decentralisation to guide decisions and to monitor the achievement of objectives. The Ministry of Health adapted and tested the micro-planning tool in two counties, with technical assistance from UNICEF, and later scaled it up to the entire country covering all of 47 counties. This Field Note presents the steps in micro-planning and discusses the challenges and successes of the process.
Date: 20 July 2015
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Real-Time Monitoring of Rural Sanitation at Scale in Zambia Using Mobile-to-Web Technologies

While there is great enthusiasm for using digitalized methods for monitoring rural sanitation interventions, the process is still in its pilot phase in many countries and there exists relatively little evidence to inform national scale-up. To address this gap in information, this note reports an efficient and effective sector-wide monitoring framework that is working at scale.
Date: 20 July 2015
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Going Beyond ODF: Combining Sanitation Marketing with Participatory Approaches to Sustain ODF Communities in Malawi

The majority of households in rural Malawi construct traditional latrines with a lifespan of less than 12 months. The short lifespan of traditional latrines calls into question the sustainability of ODF status in rural villages. The typical range of sanitation products tends to be extremely limited and options are often prohibitively expensive for rural householders. High costs were commonly associated with cement prices in Malawi - USD12 per 50kg. This Field Note records the experiences to date of developing a national sanitation marketing

Date: 20 July 2015
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