menstrual hygiene

Menstrual Cups and Reusable Pads Are Literally Changing Lives Uganda’s Refugee Camps

Menstrual hygiene management is a challenge for many women across Africa. Sanitary pads are expensive, meaning many women use rags or even leaves to protect their underwear, putting them at greater risk of infection. A lack of sanitation at schools leads to many girls staying home during their periods or dropping out altogether when they start menstruating.

According to one 2016 study, over 90 percent of Ugandan primary schoolgirls struggle with maintaining their menstrual hygiene.

For refugee women, periods are a dangerous, shameful time

On any given day, more than 800 million women between 15 and 49 have their period. However, globally 1.25 billion women do not have access to a toilet during menstruation, according to the charity WaterAid.

For refugee women, fleeing their homes for safety, the challenges of a period can be even greater.

"There's no dignity in having your period when you're a refugee," Terri Harris, of the Muslim women-led development charity Global One told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Menstrual health and school absenteeism among adolescent girls in Uganda (MENISCUS): a feasibility study

Management of menstruation can present substantial challenges to girls in low-income settings. In preparation for a menstrual hygiene intervention to reduce school absenteeism in Uganda, this study aimed to investigate menstruation management practices, barriers and facilitators, and the influence of menstruation on school absenteeism among secondary school students in a peri-urban district of Uganda.

Date: 10 January 2018
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Understanding and defining sanitation insecurity: women’s gendered experiences of urination, defecation and menstruation in rural Odisha, India

Research suggests that the lived experience of inadequate sanitation may contribute to poor health outcomes above and beyond pathogen exposure, particularly among women.

Date: 3 January 2018
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London 'launch & learn' event introducing the Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in emergencies toolkit!

Join a 'launch & learn' event introducing the new MHM in emergencies toolkit! The development of this multi-sectoral resource, which included rigorous research, consultations, and field piloting, was led by the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and Columbia University, with valuable expertise and insights provided from a range of global humanitarian actors. The resource is co-published by 25 leading humanitarian organisations.

Register for the 6th Annual Virtual Conference on MHM in Schools

The 6th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Schools, co-hosted by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and UNICEF on the 17th October 2017, provides an opportunity to share the latest research and programming from around the world. The virtual conference is expected to bring together online over 1,000 participants.

For the first time ever, the virtual conference will be streaming live from the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina’s annual Water & Health Conference!

Call for abstracts for the 6th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management in Schools

The 6th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Schools, co-hosted by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and UNICEF on the 17th October 2017, provides an opportunity to share the latest research and programming from around the world. The virtual conference is expected to bring together online over 1,000 participants from around the world. For the first time ever, the virtual conference will be streaming live from the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina’s annual Water & Health Conference!

The Period Movement: Meet the Men Fighting to Stop Menstruation-Shaming in the Developing World

Around the world, girls and women miss classes, drop out of school and fail to reach their full potential because of a natural biological process: menstruation. Many girls grow up in communities where menstruation is shrouded in shame and stigma, misinformation is rampant and clean menstrual supplies are scarce.Over the past few years, a menstruation movement—spearheaded largely by female activists, many of them millennials—has swept the U.S., aiming to destigmatize periods and bring safer products to women and girls everywhere.

Kenya is promising free sanitary napkins to help keep girls in school

Kenya’s president has promised to give all school girls free sanitary napkins. Less than two months before Kenyans go to the polls, president Uhuru Kenyatta signed the Basic Education Amendment Act which compels the government to provide “free, sufficient and quality sanitary towels to every girl child registered and enrolled in a public basic education institution.”

Read more in Quartz Africa, 23rd June 2017

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