Health

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

Behaviour Change for WASH: Policy Brief

Since 2010, the SHARE Consortium has prioritised behaviour change in WASH interventions, championing the importance of identifying novel and creative approaches to changing behaviours across many countries. This policy brief documents SHARE’s contribution to understanding behaviour change and associated health impacts. It provides recommendations for researchers and intervention implementers, policy makers and funders.

Date: 26 July 2018

Urban sanitation coverage and environmental fecal contamination: Links between the household and public environments of Accra, Ghana

Exposure to faecal contamination in public areas, especially in dense, urban environments, may significantly contribute to gastrointestinal infection risk. This study examined associations between sanitation and faecal contamination in public environments in four low-income neighbourhoods in Accra, Ghana. Soil and open drain samples were tested for E. coli, adenovirus, and norovirus. Sanitation facilities in surveyed households were categorised by onsite faecal sludge containment (“contained” vs. “uncontained”) using previous Joint Monitoring Program infrastructure guidelines.

Date: 26 July 2018
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Reduction of stunting by CLTS in Mali: a case study to learn from

Mali is renowned as the location of the one of the few Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes that has managed to demonstrate a reduction in stunting from increased community-level sanitation coverage. There is much to learn and share from this programme, especially across the West and Central Africa region where similar sanitation challenges are faced and open defecation rates generally remain high.

Community-Level Sanitation Coverage More Strongly Associated with Child Growth and Household Drinking Water Quality than Access to a Private Toilet in Rural Mali

This article is an overview of a study that investigated the effect of community sanitation coverage versus individual household sanitation access on child health and drinking water quality. Using a census of 121 villages in rural Mali, the research team analysed the association of community latrine coverage (defined by a 200 meter radius surrounding a household) and individual household latrine ownership with child growth and household stored water quality.

Date: 11 July 2018
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Effect of a community-led sanitation intervention on child diarrhoea and child growth in rural Mali: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

This article provides a brief overview of the method and findings from a cluster-randomised trial that was conducted in 2011-2013 in Koulikoro, Mali, to assess a government implemented Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programme’s effect on child health.

Date: 11 July 2018
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Effects of water quality, sanitation, handwashing, and nutritional interventions on diarrhoea and child growth in rural Kenya: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

Poor nutrition and exposure to faecal contamination are associated with diarrhoea and growth faltering, both of which have long-term consequences for child health. This trial aimed to assess whether water, sanitation, handwashing, and nutrition interventions reduced diarrhoea or growth faltering.

Date: 26 February 2018
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