Health

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

From new evidence to better practice: finding the sanitation sweet spot

A growing body of evidence shows that there is a strong causal link between exposure to poor sanitation and detrimental health, human capital, and economic outcomes. At the same time a number of recent impact evaluations of specific sanitation interventions show mixed results. waterlines.jpg

This heterogeneity in findings raises the questions of whether and how the demonstrated benefits of improved sanitation can be consistently achieved through regular project implementation.

Date: 7 November 2017

Moving through the generations taking forward WASH... no longer just for the majority and those with the loudest voice

I have just completed three days at the WEDC 40th International Conference held at Loughborough University in the UK. As always the conference was packed with a wide range of interesting paper presentations, posters, side-events and associated activities. Meeting colleagues new and old from across the globe is always a wonderful part of a WEDC conference and at the same time to become aware of the range of experience and learning that has been going on over the past few years. This year was no exception.

The effect of young children's faeces disposal practices on child growth: Evidence from 34 countries

The study by Valerie Bauza and Jeremy S. Guest looked at the relationship between child faeces disposal and child growth in low- and middle-income countries. You can read a more detailed abstract here. It was published in the Journal of Tropical Medicine and International Health is available for purchase from the Wiley Online Library

Date: 21 July 2017

Switching to sanitation: Understanding latrine adoption in a representative panel of rural Indian households

Open defecation, which is still practiced by about a billion people worldwide, is one of the most compelling examples of how place influences health in developing countries. Efforts by governments and development organizations to address the world's remaining open defecation would be greatly supported by a better understanding of why some people adopt latrines and others do not.

Date: 17 July 2017
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Associations between Household Latrines and the Prevalence of Diarrhea in Idiofa, Democratic Republic of the Congo: A Cross-Sectional Study

Despite the importance of sanitation, few studies have assessed the effects of latrines on the health outcomes of children under 5 years of age. This study assessed the relations between latrine coverage and the prevalence of diarrhea in children under 4 years of age. It analyzed the baseline data obtained as part of a longitudinal survey targeting 720 households in Idiofa, Bandundu, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Date: 13 July 2017

The impact of sanitation on infectious disease and nutritional status: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Sanitation aims to sequester human feces and prevent exposure to fecal pathogens. More than 2.4 billion people worldwide lack access to improved sanitation facilities and almost one billion practice open defecation. This study by Freeman et al undertook systematic reviews and meta-analyses to compile the most recent evidence on the impact of sanitation on diarrhea, soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections, trachoma, schistosomiasis, and nutritional status assessed using anthropometry.

Date: 22 June 2017

An individual-level meta-analysis assessing the impact of community-level sanitation access on child stunting, anemia, and diarrhea

A lack of access to sanitation is an important risk factor child health, facilitating fecal-oral transmission of pathogens including soil-transmitted helminthes and various causes of diarrheal disease. This study by David A. Larsen, Thomas Grisham, Erik Slawsky and Lutchmie Narine conducted a meta-analysis of cross-sectional surveys to determine the impact that community-level sanitation access has on child health for children with and without household sanitation access.

Date: 22 June 2017

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