Governments and Institutions

Micro-Planning for CLTS: Experience from Kenya

Micro-planning is a tool often used in the context of decentralisation to guide decisions and to monitor the achievement of objectives. The Ministry of Health adapted and tested the micro-planning tool in two counties, with technical assistance from UNICEF, and later scaled it up to the entire country covering all of 47 counties. This Field Note presents the steps in micro-planning and discusses the challenges and successes of the process.
Date: 20 July 2015
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Taking Stock of CLTS implementation in Ghana

The third national CLTS Stocktaking Forum, organised by the Environmental Health and Sanitation Directorate (EHSD) Directorate of the Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development (MLGRD) was held from the 19th to 21st April 2015 at Fumesua near the Ashanti regional capital of Kumasi, Ghana. There were over 120 participants from the EHSD, CWSA, Water Directorate, Development partners, NGOs and Academia.

Date: 14 July 2015
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Frontières Numéro 4: Durabilité et ATPC : État des lieux

La notion de durabilité est sans aucun doute l’un des sujets les plus brûlants qui sous-tende nombre des questions que nous rencontrons dans le cadre de l’ATPC et de l’ensemble des pratiques WASH. Plusieurs études utiles sur la durabilité ont mis en évidence certains de ses différents aspects et les complexités associées. Toutefois, il est difficile de dire combien d’enseignements tirés de ces études ont été véritablement intégrés dans la programmation et les pratiques actuelles et futures.

Date: 30 April 2015

Need to clean our biases first, then our streets

The country is ostensibly in the throes of a great social movement for sanitation. Gandhi’s name is evoked, Prime Minister Narendra Modi leads from the front, ministers lift brooms for cameras, and officers, college and school children take oaths against littering and to clean their surroundings. Earlier the PM pledges in his Independence Day speech toilets for girls and boys in all schools.

Action Learning: Swachh Bharat Abhiyan’s missing master key

The number and nature of the many forces that intertwine to trap rural Indians in filth and infections are still not fully recognised. Widespread preference for open defecation (OD), subsidised toilets, corruption, caste and divided communities, concepts of purity, population increase and density, faecally-transmitted infections (FTIs) causing undernutrition (‘shit stunts’), diminishing cognitive ability and damaging immune systems, and the multiple physical and social harms inflicted on women and girls – these are among the forces that interlock as a syndrome - a net, a trap, a prison - escape from which is fiendishly difficult.

Will Narendra Modi free India from open defecation?

“Has it ever pained us that our mothers and sisters have to defecate in the open?” With these words, the new Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi last week pushed sanitation up the hierarchy of national concerns. Using the solemn speech in the annual commemoration of the Independence Day, Modi announced a new campaign to eliminate open defecation – the practice of people relieving themselves in the open – by 150th anniversary of Gandhi’s birth in 2019.

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