FSM

Tiger worm toilets turn poo into fertiliser in crowded cities and refugee camps

Tiger worm toilets which turn human waste into fertiliser could prove to be an affordable and sustainable sanitation solution for increasingly crowded slums and refugee camps across the developing world, water and sanitation experts say.

The earthworm-filled toilets take up less space than pit latrines, need to be emptied far less frequently, present less of a health risk, and can provide communities with rich compost for growing crops, according to sanitation specialists.

Making shit a commodity: finding a fortune at the bottom of a leach pit

Leach pit emptying events should not remain stand-alone activity. Forward and backward linkages in making manure a commodity bought, sold and traded in market will be very much helpful in shifting preference to leach pits and issue of partial usage can be tackled and will be surely a win-win situation for all stakeholders.

India's Rural Sanitation: From lose-lose to win-win

Prime Minister Modi has set the 2nd October 2019 as the target date for rural India to be Open Defecation Free (ODF). Remarkable progress has been achieved, but there is a very long way still to go.  One major problem is partial usage of toilets.  Jamie Myers and I reviewed studies and surveys and their methodologies and concluded that in rural North India at least half the toilets that are functioning are not used by all members of the household all the time.

Septage Management Leader's Guidebook

Many cities and municipalities throughout the Philippines are now discussing methods of improving local sanitation, and septage management is on the radar of many of their mayors. Through the activities of donor and supporting organizations such as Oxfam GB, capacity is being built through the introduction of international best practices. The Septage Management Leader’s Guidebook breaks down the process of implementing septage management programs in an easy to read, step-by-step basis.

Date: 11 August 2016
Country: 

Faecal Sludge Management: a crucial aspect of WASH

The WEDC Conference 2016 had an impressive line up of paper presentations, side sessions and capacity building workshops across the entire WASH value chain and proved to be an interesting and engaging experience. I participated and interacted with the presenters, participants and facilitators mostly involved with CLTS and scaling up rural sanitation. The learning and sharing side session organized by the CLTS Hub was appropriately timed at the beginning of the conference, setting the context for understanding the WASH context in Ghana as well as other African countries.

Subscribe to RSS - FSM