Children and schools

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

‘We do not know’: a qualitative study exploring boys’ perceptions of menstruation in India

This study explores knowledge and attitudes about menstruation among adolescent boys across India, in order to gauge their potential to support young women. The findings show some optimism in these young men becoming advocates and moving forward the Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) agenda. The boys were keen for knowledge about menstruation, searching information out despite societal norms, they were also largely sympathetic to menstruating sisters and classmates and understanding of the issues surrounding the need for good MHM.

 

 

Date: 7 March 2018
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Toward a Hygienic Environment for Infants and Young Children: A Review of the Literature (WASHpals)

The USAID Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project conducted a review of the scientific and grey literature, complemented by dozens of key informant interviews with researchers and field implementers, to synthesize the latest understanding of key pathways of fecal microbe ingestion by IYC and their links to diarrhea, EED, and poor nutrition and development outcomes.
Specifically, the review sought to:

Date: 21 February 2018

Sanitation boosts health, not stunted growth for Bangladeshi kids

Children born into housing compounds with improvements in drinking water quality, sanitation, and handwashing infrastructure were not measurably taller after two years compared to those born into compounds with more contamination, a new study suggests. Although children who received the interventions were significantly healthier overall, and despite mounting research over the last decade linking poor sanitation to stunted growth in children, sanitation improvements seemingly did nothing to improve growth and development.

Menstrual health and school absenteeism among adolescent girls in Uganda (MENISCUS): a feasibility study

Management of menstruation can present substantial challenges to girls in low-income settings. In preparation for a menstrual hygiene intervention to reduce school absenteeism in Uganda, this study aimed to investigate menstruation management practices, barriers and facilitators, and the influence of menstruation on school absenteeism among secondary school students in a peri-urban district of Uganda.

Date: 10 January 2018
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The recipe for success: how policy-makers can integrate water, sanitation and hygiene into actions to end malnutrition

At current rates of progress, the world will not meet the Sustainable Development Goals to end malnutrition by 2030. In this report, Action Against Hunger, WaterAid and SHARE assert that the integration of action on nutrition and WASH is fundamental to the recipe for success.

You can also read this related blog on the WaterAid website and watch a short video

Date: 28 September 2017

Register for the 6th Annual Virtual Conference on MHM in Schools

The 6th Annual Virtual Conference on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) in Schools, co-hosted by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and UNICEF on the 17th October 2017, provides an opportunity to share the latest research and programming from around the world. The virtual conference is expected to bring together online over 1,000 participants.

For the first time ever, the virtual conference will be streaming live from the Water Institute at the University of North Carolina’s annual Water & Health Conference!

The effect of young children's faeces disposal practices on child growth: Evidence from 34 countries

The study by Valerie Bauza and Jeremy S. Guest looked at the relationship between child faeces disposal and child growth in low- and middle-income countries. You can read a more detailed abstract here. It was published in the Journal of Tropical Medicine and International Health is available for purchase from the Wiley Online Library

Date: 21 July 2017

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