Children and schools

Key resource: Re-framing Undernutrition: Faecally-Transmitted Infections and the 5 As (IDS Working Paper 450)

In this IDS Working Paper, Robert Chambers (CLTS Knowledge Hub, IDS) and Gregor von Medeazza (UNICEF) argue for a more inclusive framework for thinking about and dealing with undernutrition.  One concept is FTIs (faecally-transmitted infections).  This is designed to avoid the reductionisms of faecal-oral infections, waterborne diseases, and the focus on the diarrhoeas to the neglect of less dramatic and less measurable FTIs especially environmental enteropathy.  A second concept is the 5 As – availability and access which both have oral associations, and absorption, antibodies and allopath

Date: 31 October 2014

Podcast: Involving local communities for sustainable WASH in Schools

In this episode of WASH Talks podcast series, host Andy Narracott talks about WASH in schools with Linda Lilian, Knowledge Management and Learning Specialist at Simavi Uganda, and Machtelt Oudenhuijzen, Senior Programme Manager at Aqua for All and lead of the Football for Water programme.

Date: 12 November 2018

Fostering Collective Action to Improve Sanitation in Rural Cambodia

Rural Cambodia is home to the largest proportion of individuals practicing open defecation in Southeast Asia. The Cambodia Rural Sanitation and Hygiene Improvement Program (CRSHIP) has sought to address harmful sanitation practices by increasing access to improved sanitation and promoting proper hygiene in rural target areas.

Date: 13 September 2018
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Reduction of stunting by CLTS in Mali: a case study to learn from

Mali is renowned as the location of the one of the few Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programmes that has managed to demonstrate a reduction in stunting from increased community-level sanitation coverage. There is much to learn and share from this programme, especially across the West and Central Africa region where similar sanitation challenges are faced and open defecation rates generally remain high.

(Photo: Children outside school in Koulikoro, Mali)

Community-Level Sanitation Coverage More Strongly Associated with Child Growth and Household Drinking Water Quality than Access to a Private Toilet in Rural Mali

This article is an overview of a study that investigated the effect of community sanitation coverage versus individual household sanitation access on child health and drinking water quality. Using a census of 121 villages in rural Mali, the research team analysed the association of community latrine coverage (defined by a 200 meter radius surrounding a household) and individual household latrine ownership with child growth and household stored water quality.

Date: 11 July 2018
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Effect of a community-led sanitation intervention on child diarrhoea and child growth in rural Mali: a cluster-randomised controlled trial

This article provides a brief overview of the method and findings from a cluster-randomised trial that was conducted in 2011-2013 in Koulikoro, Mali, to assess a government implemented Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) programme’s effect on child health.

Date: 11 July 2018
Country: 

Fatal dangers of poorly maintained school pit latrines in South Africa

This BBC news article tells the tragic story of a five-year-old boy, Michael Komape, drowning in a poorly maintained school pit latrine in northern South Africa in 2014. It highlights a serious national problem: less than a fifth of schools have access to a latrine and where they do many have been found to be unsafe, which has resulted in another similar tragic death of a young girl this year.

Learning Brief: Ensuring Child Safety During and After CLTS

Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) has been implemented in Cambodia since 2005 as a means of improving sanitation and hygiene practices in rural communities, and mobilising them to achieve open defecation free (ODF) status. In CLTS, children are often encouraged to be change agents to help influence their family and community to improve sanitation and hygiene behaviors. However, some strategies may pose a risk to child safety.

Date: 11 June 2018
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